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THE KING'S CLASSICS UNDER 
THE GENERAL EDITORSHIP OF 
PROFESSOR I. GOLLANCZ 




THE POETS ROYAL OF 
ENGLAND AND SCOTLAND 



All righli rtiervcd 




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Onuugenii uuit tcgna beau boaif. 



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THE POETS ROYAL 
OF ENGLAND AND 
SCOTLAND EDITED 
BY WILLIAM BAILEY- 
KEMPLING 




CHATTO AND WINDUS, PUBLISHERS 
LONDON, 1908 



KINGS 
. WITH THE MUSES EASE THEIR WEARIED MINDS. 

TllEN BLUSH NOT ... TO PROTECT, 

WHAT GODS INSPIRE, AND KINGS DELIGHT TO HEAR. 

WISE WERE THE KINGS . . . 

ROSCOMMON'S HORACE, Of the Art of Poetry , 



1118 



TO 

HER ROYAL HIGHNESS 

THE 

PRINCESS LOUISE, 

DUCHESS OF ARGYLL, 

THIS VOLUME 

IS 

by permission 
DEDICATED 



PREFACE 

BRITISH " princes have dipt at times their pens in 
ink," says Mallet. The result of this dipping is a 
considerable amount of rhyme, and some few examples 
of true poesy ; the greater bulk of which is preserved 
to this day, and catalogued by Walpole, and Park. 
These compositions, however, scattered up and down 
in half-forgotten tomes, have not, hitherto, been pub 
lished in an accessible form. Therefore an anthology 
of verse purporting to be of Royal and Noble 
authorship may be allowed, at least, some claim to 
consideration. 

In such a work it is manifestly undesirable to attempt 
any discussion of vexed questions of authenticity ; the 
pieces herein being accepted in good faith, like many 
others before and since, by those whose critical acumen 
is deserving of all respect. 

Obvious forgeries, and poems written for and in the 
name of certain monarchs by other people, have, in 



XII 



PREFACE 



each case, been rejected. Of these, a large number is 
known to exist. The same also applies to the rhymed 
Charters commonly ascribed to Edward Confessor, 
Athelstan, etc., and to various Royal Riddles (so- 
called). The book, indeed, might easily have been 
expanded to more than double its present size by the 
including of such items as the Casket Sonnets under the 
name of Mary of Scotland, and Christ's Kirk on the 
Green f Peeblis to the Play, The Jolly Beggar, etc., which 
some critics would ascribe to James V of Scotland 
only because they cannot well inflict them upon James I, 
albeit there are occasional persons found bold enough 
even for that 

As for the merits of the various Royal Poets, all that 
need now be said is that the Stuart would seem to 
rank higher than the Tudor or Plantagenet. James I, 
of Scotland, conspicuously excelling. The King's 
Quire will be remembered when much that is less 
worthy is forgotten. It is the earliest great Scots 
poem extant, and, like the work of our own Alfred, 
enduring to all futurity. 

In regard to text, everything has been done to secure 
what may be regarded as the best possible in the cir 
cumstances. Manuscripts and early and later texts 
have been compared side by side : spelling has been 



PREFACE xiii 

modernised as far as was found expedient : punctu 
ation has also received some little care, and one or two 
new translations are here printed for the first time. 
(See also NOTES.) 

The Noble Authors here represented include only 
those who were allied to Royalty by marriage ties ; 
the list is not exhaustive. 

Certain stray poetic trifles and fragments, though 
not essential to the garland, are, perhaps, entitled 
to some sort of place. A passing prefatory notice 
of these, therefore, may not be out of order ; among 
them two, at least, have enjoyed comparative popu 
larity. 

Spenser eulogised Queen Elizabeth's " peerless skill 
in making well ; " and he was a better critic than a 
flatterer. According to Fuller, she was an adept with 
the ready rebus and distich, of which forms of com 
position the antiquary gives several examples. One of 
these, written by the Queen upon Noel, is certainly 
a propos, and runs : 

" The word of denial, the letter ofjifty, 
Is that gentleman's name who will never be thrifty." 

The author of the Worthies, however, subsequently 
credited this to Sir Walter Raleigh. He also relates 



xiv PREFACE 

how that Raleigh, having scratched upon a window 
pane, with a diamond ring, the words : 

" Fain would I climb, yet fear I to fall," 

Elizabeth, who was present, immediately added below : 

If thy heart fail thee, climb not at all." 

Again, Mary, * Queen of Scots,' on good authority, 
is said to have written, upon a window in Fotheringay 
Castle : 

" From the top of all my trust, 
Mishap has laid me in the dust." 

Seward affirms, that, on a blank leaf of a book in the 
Treaty House, Newport, Isle of Wight, Charles I 
wrote : 

" A coward's still unsafe ; but courage knows 
No other foe but him who doth oppose." 

Then there is King Charles' famous Golden Rules,' 
or : 

Twelve good rules found in the study of King Charles the 
First of blessed memory : 

" Profane ") No ( Divine Ordinances 

Touch > No < State Matters 

Urge ) No (Healths 

Pick ") No ( Quarrels 

Maintain > No < 111 Opinions 

Encourage ) No ( Vice 



PREFACE xv 

Repeat ^ No ( Grievances 

Reveal I No / Secrets 

Make J No ( Comparisons 

Keep \ No ( Bad Company 

Make I No < Long Meals 

Lay ) No ( Wagers 

These rules observed will obtain 
Thy peace and everlasting gain." 

Once more, when the witty Earl of Rochester wrote 
his famous mock epitaph on Charles II : 

" Here lies the mutton-eating king 
Whose word no man relies on ; 
He never said a foolish thing, 
And never did a wise one ; " 

it is asserted that the equally witty monarch observed : 

" If death could speak, the king would say, 

In justice to his crown, 
His acts they were his ministers', 
His words they were his own." 

And finally, Mary II, a queen evidently incapable of 
anything vindictive, having discovered the alleged 
duplicity of L' Estrange, wrote him down : 

" Roger L'Estrange, 
Lying strange Roger I " 

So much, then, for these right royal squibs. 



xvi PREFACE 

The Editor is indebted to the kindness of Professor 
Gollancz for his translation from King Alfred ; to the 
Rev. Professor Skeat for much valued assistance in 
preparing a revised text ot the selected stanzas from 
The Kingis Quair, and the Ballad of Good Counsel, as 
well as for compiling notes, reading proofs, etc. ; to 
Dr. Edmund Gosse, for an important reference; to 
Messrs. Chambers and Sidgwick, and to Mr. Bullen, 
for permission to quote from Early English Lyrics ; 
and to Mr. J. R. Tutin, beside other friends, for much 
timely suggestion and help. Without this generous aid 
the work would have been very imperfect. 

In conclusion one would say with the author of 
The King's Quire : 

" Go litill tretise, nakit of eloquence, 

Causing simplese and pouertee to wit, 
And pray the reder to have pacience 
Of thy defaute, and to supporter) it, 
Of his gudnese thy brukilnese to knytt, 
And his tong for to reule[n] and to stere, 
That thy defautis helit may ben here." 

W. BAILEY-KEMPLING. 



CONTENTS 

PAGE 

PREFACE . . . . . xi 

THE POETS ROYAL OF ENGLAND 

KING ALFRED . . 3 

RICHARD I . . r 

EDWARD II . . . . 7 

EDWARD PLANTAGENET . . .9 

HENRY VI . . . . 12 

GEORGE, DUKE OF CLARENCE . .13 

EARL RIVERS . . . 14 

ELIZABETH OF YORK . . .17 

HENRY VIII ... 20 

ANNE BOLEYN , . . .27 

GEORGE BOLEYN . . . 28 

SIR THOMAS SEYMOUR . . .31 

ANNE, MARGARET AND JANE SEYMOUR 32 

EDWARD VI . . 35 



CONTENTS 

T HE POETS ROYAL OF ENG 

NGLAND continued 
LADY JA NE GREY 

QUEEN ELIZABETH 
JAMES I 

ELIZABETH STUART . 
CHARLES I 
CHARLES II 

; AKL OF CLARENDON 

'OETS RoYAT or Q 

fAL OF SCOTLAND 
JAMES I 

MARGARET STUART 

JAMES V 75 

MARY, Q UEEN op SCOTS 

LORD DARNLEY 8z 

NOTES * 87 

GLOSSARY . 9 1 

INDEX TO F,RST L,NES IO1 

105 



THE POETS ROYAL OF 
ENGLAND 



THE POETS ROYAL OF 
ENGLAND 

i 

KING ALFRED 

849-901 

" O Reason, well knoweth thou that the greed of 
covetousness and the possession of this earthly power 
never greatly pleased me, nor ever yearned I overmuch 
for this earthly sovereignty. Lo! my desire was but 
for the means necessary for the work I was set to do, 
that I might honourably and fittingly steer the mighty 
power entrusted to me. 

Verily, thou knowest that no man can show any 
skill, nor can he steer any craft without tackle and gear. 
Every skill needeth its tools ; and without these a man 
cannot work. A king also must have his materials 
and tools. His tools are these, a well-peopled land, 
with men of prayer, men of war, men of work. Well 
3 



4 THE POETS ROYAL OF ENGLAND 

knoweth thou that without these tools a king cannot 
show his skill. 

Eke must he have the materials for their mainte 
nance ; and they are these, land for them to dwell 
in, gifts, weapons, meat, ale, clothes, and all other 
requirements. Without these he cannot keep his tools 
aright ; without the tools he cannot perform any of 
the duties entrusted to him. 

So I, too, have desired the means wherewith to 
wield my sway, that my craftsmanship and my power 
might not be forgotten or hidden ; for every gift and 
every power soon groweth old, and nought is heard of 
it, if wisdom be not with it. Without wisdom a man 
cannot bring forth any faculty ; and whatsoever a man 
doeth in folly cannot be accounted as skill. 

In a word, I would now say that I have ever desired 
to live honourably while I live, and after my life to 
leave to those who come after me my memory in good 
works." 

(Translated from Old English Version of Boethius : 
de Consolatione Philosophic.} 



KING RICHARD THE FIRST 



II 

KING RICHARD THE FIRST 
1157-1199 

IF captive wight attempt the tuneful strain, 
His voice, belike, full dolefully will sound ; 
Yet, to the sad, 'tis comfort to complain. 

Friends have I store, and promises abound ; 
Shame on the niggards ! since, these winters twain 
Unransom'd, still I bear a tyrant's chain. 

Full well they know, my lords and nobles all, 
Of England, Normandy, Guienne, Poictou, 

Ne'er did I slight my poorest vassal's call, 

But all, whom wealth could buy, from chains with 
drew. 

Not in reproach I speak, nor idly vain, 

But I alone unpitied bear the chain. 

My fate will show, " the dungeon and the grave 
Alike repel our kindred and our friends." 



6 THE POETS ROYAL OF ENGLAND 

Here am I left their paltry gold to save ! 

Sad fate is mine ; but worse their crime attends, 
Their lord will die ; their conscience shall remain, 
And tell how long I wore this galling chain. 

No wonder though my heart with grief boil o'er, 
When he, my perjur'd lord, invades my lands ; 

Forgets he then the oaths he lately swore, 

When both, in treaty, join'd our plighted hands ? 

Else, sure I ween, I should not long remain, 

Unpitied here to wear a tyrant's chain. 

To those my friends, long lov'd, and ever dear, 
To gentle Chaill, and kind Persarain, 

Go forth my song, and say, whate'er they hear, 
To them my heart was never false or vain. 

Should they rebel but no ; their souls disdain 

With added weight to load a captive's chain. 

Know then the youths of Anjou and Touraine, 
Those lusty bachelors, those airy lords, 

That these vile walls their captive king restrain ? 
Sure they in aid will draw their loyal swords ! 

Alas ! nor faith, nor valour, now remain ; 

Sighs are but wind, and I must bear my chain. 
* * * * 



KING EDWARD THE SECOND 



III 
KING EDWARD THE SECOND 

1284-1327 

WHAT time rough winter's blasts the earth did 
tame, 

Storms of ill-fortune shook my glorious frame. 
There's none so wise, so merciful and fair, 
Prudent and shining with all virtues rare, 
But he's by abject wretches trampled down, 
If fortune once on his endeavours frown. 
That hand, that once did grace to all dispense, 
Can move no heart to a remorseful sense. 
That royal face, whose smiles afforded bliss, 
With clouds of dark dishonour blackened is. 
My vassals, once, do spurn me now ; and those 
Whom I esteem'd my friends, do prove my foes. 
Oh ! who that heard how once they prais'd my 

name, 
Would think that from those tongues these slanders 

came ? 



8 THE POETS ROYAL OF ENGLAND 

But, sinful soul, why dost thou thus repine 
When justly humbled by the hand Divine ? 
A Father's scourge is for our profit meant : 
I see Thy rod, and, Lord, I am content. 
Chide me, my Father, till Thou wilt give o'er, 
Afflict till Thou art pleased to restore. 
Thy son submits and doth Thy will obey, 
But grieves thus long he did this work delay. 
Now then, my Father, view my wretched case, 
And shine upon me with a smiling face. 
Forgive what's past : for what's to come assist ; 
Then I'll take gladly what my murd'rers list. 
I've lost my kingdom ; yet shall not repine, 
If, after all, I gain but that of Thine. 
To Thee, sweet Jesus, humbly here I bend : 
I loathe my sins, do Thou my pardon send. 
Fountain of Love, allow my hearty prayers ; 
Remember Thine Own blood, tho' not my tears. 
When man afflicts, then, Lord, do Thou forgive ; 
And when I die, grant that my soul may live. 



EDWARD PLANTAGENET 



IV 
EDWARD PLANTAGENET, DUKE OF 

YORK 
Died 1415 (?) 

EXCELLENT sovereign! seemly to see, 
Proved prudence, peerless of price, 
Bright blossom of benignity, 

Figure fairest and freshest of device. 

I recommend me to your royalness, 

As lowly as I can or may, 
Beseeching inwardly your gentleness ; 

Let never faint heart true love betray. 

Your womanly beauty delicious 

Hath me hent all into his chain, 
But ye grant me your love gracious, 

My heart will melt as snow in rain. 

If ye wist my life, and knew 

And of the pains that I feel, 
I wys ye would upon me rue, 

Though your heart were made of steel, 



io THE POETS ROYAL OF ENGLAND 

And though ye be of high renoun, 
Let mercy incline your heart so free, 

To you, lady, this is my boun, 

To grant me grace, in some degree. 

To your mercy would ye me take, 

If your will were for to do, 
Then would I truly for your sake 

Change my chere and slake my woe. 

My heart is set in your delight, 

Preveth it well be experience, 
And to you my troth I plight, 

That ever I dread your offence. 

Alas ! that God ne had 

By very reason of truth, 
In your person properly made 

Half your beauty, mercy, and ruth. 

But fortune is nothing my friend, 
But ever she casteth me to spill, 

For love I may no longer lend, 
So he proposeth me to spill. 



EDWARD PLANTAGENET n 

But since it stant in such degree, 
And may none otherwise trend, 

Of farewell, my end shall be, 
To youward, wherever ye wend. 

* * * * 

Explicit Amor, per ducem Ebor. nup. fact. 



12 THE POETS ROYAL OF ENGLAND 

V 

KING HENRY THE SIXTH 
1421-1461 

KINGDOMS are but cares, 
State is devoid of stay, 
Riches are ready snares, 
And hasten to decay. 

Pleasure is a privy prick 

Which vice doth still provoke ; 

Pomp, imprompt ; and fame, a flame ; 
Power, a smouldering smoke. 

Who meaneth to remove the rock 

Owt of the slimy mud, 
Shall mire himself, and hardly scape 

The swelling of the flood. 

Patience is the armour and conquest of the godly : 
this meriteth mercy, when causless is suffered sorrow. 

Nought else is war but fury and madness, wherein is 
not advice, but rashness : not right, but rage, ruleth 
and reigneth. HENRY. 



DUKE OF CLARENCE 13 



VI 
GEORGE, DUKE OF CLARENCE 

ON HIS PRESENTING A WHITE ROSE TO LADY ANN 

BEAUCHAMP, OF THE LANCASTRIAN PARTY 

OHOULD this fair rose offend thy sight, 
\^J Placed on thy bosom bare, 
'Twill blush to find itself less white 
And turn Lancastrian there. 

But if thy ruby lips it spy, 

To kiss it shouldst thou deign, 

With blushes pale, 'twill lose its dye, 
And Yorkist turn again. 



i 4 THE POETS ROYAL OF ENGLAND 

VII 

ANTHONY WIDVILLE, EARL RIVERS 
1442-1483 

A BALET BY THE EARL RIVERS 

SOMEWHAT musing, 
And more mourning, 
In remembring 

The unsteadfastness ; 
This world being 
Of such wheeling, 
Me contrarying, 
What may I guess ? 

I fear doutless 
Remedyless, 
Is now to cess 

My woefull chance ; 
QFor unkindness 
Withouten less, 
And no redress, 

Me doth advance. 



EARL RIVERS 

With displesance 

To my great grievance 

And no surance 

Of remedy ;] 
Lo ! in this trance, 
Now in substance, 
Such is my dance, 

Willing to die. 

Me thinketh truly 
Bounden am I, 
And that greatly, 

To be content ; 
Saying plainly, 
Fortune doth wry 
All contrary 

For mine entent. 

My life was lent 
To an entent, 
It is nigh spent ; 

Welcome fortune ! 
Yet I ne went 
Thus to be shent, 
But she is ment ; 

Such is her wone. 



16 THE POETS ROYAL OF ENGLAND 

" This poem was imitated by a later author in the 
following lines, which, though of very late date, were 
attributed to Chaucer ! " SKEAT. 

ALONE walking, 
In thought plainyng, 
And sore sighyng 

All desolate. 
Me remembryng 
Of my livyng, 
My death wishyng 

Both erly and late, etc. 



QUEEN ELIZABETH OF YORK 17 



VIII 

QUEEN ELIZABETH OF YORK 
1466-1503 

MY heart is set upon a lusty pin ; 
I pray to Venus of good continuance, 
For I rejoice the case that I am in, 
Deliver'd from sorrow, annex'd to pleasance, 
Of all comfort having abundance ; 
This joy and I, I trust, shall never twin 
My heart is set upon a lusty pin. 



I pray to Venus of good continuance 
Since she hath set me in the way of ease ; 
My hearty service with my attendance 
So to continue it ever I may please ; 
Thus voiding from all pensful disease, 
Now stand I whole far from all grievance- 
I pray to Venus of good continuance. 



i 8 THE POETS ROYAL OF ENGLAND 

For I rejoice the case that I am in, 

My gladness is such that giveth me no pain, 

And so to sorrow never shall I blynne, 

And though I would I may not me refrain ; 

My heart and I so set 'tis certain 

We shall never slake, but ever new begin 

For I rejoice the case that I am in. 



Deliver'd from sorrow, annex'd to pleasance, 

That all my joy I set as aught of right, 

To please as after my simple suffisance 

To me the goodliest, most beauteous in sight ; 

A very lantern to all other light, 

Most to my comfort on her remembrance 

Deliver'd from sorrow, annex'd to pleasance. 



Of all comfort having abundance, 

As when that I think that goodlihead 

Of that most feminine and meek countenance 

Very mirror and star of womanhead ; 

Whose right good fame so large abroad doth spread, 

Full glad for me to have recognisance 

Of all comfort having abundance. 



QUEEN ELIZABETH OF YORK 19 

This joy and I, I trust, shall never twin, 
So that I am so far forth in the trace, 
My joys be double where others' are but thin, 
For I am stably set in such a place, 
Where beauty 'creaseth and ever willeth grace, 
Which is full famous and born of noble kin 
This joy and I, I trust, shall never twin. 
Finis, quod Queen Elizabeth. 



20 THE POETS ROYAL OF ENGLAND 



IX 

KING HENRY THE EIGHTH 
1491-1547 



THE eagle's force subdues each bird that flies, 
What metal can resist the flaming fire ? 
Doth not the sun dazzle the clearest eyes, 

And melt the ice, and make the frost retire ? 
The hardest stones are pierced through with tools, 
The wisest are, with princes, made but fools. 



PASTIME with good company 
I love and shall, until I die. 
Grudge who lust, but none deny, 
So God be pleased, so live will I. 
For my pastance 
Hunt, sing and dance, 



KING HENRY THE EIGHTH 21 

My heart is set : 

All goodly sport 

To my comfort 
Who shall me let ? 

Youth must have some dalliance, 
Of good or ill some pastance. 
Company me thinks the best, 
All thoughts and fancies to digest ; 

For idleness 

Is chief mistress 

Of vices all : 

Then who can say 
But mirth and play 

Is best of all ? 

Company with honesty 
Is virtue, vices to flee ; 
Company is good and ill, 
But every man has his free-will. 

The best ensue, 

The worst eschew ! 

My mind shall be, 
Virtue to use, 
Vice to refuse, 

Thus shall I use me. 



22 THE POETS ROYAL OF ENGLAND 

3 

AS the holly groweth green, 
And never changeth hue, 
So am I, and ever have been, 
Unto my lady true. 

Green groweth the holly, so doth the ivy, 
Though wintry blasts blow never so high, 
Green groweth the holly. 

As the holly groweth green 
With ivy all alone, 
When flowers cannot be seen 
And greenwood leaves be gone. 

Green groweth, etc. 

Now unto my lady 
Promise to her I make, 
From all other only 
To her I me betake. 

Green groweth, etc. 

Adieu, mine own lady, 
Adieu, my special, 



KING HENRY THE EIGHTH 23 

Who hath my heart truly, 
Be sure, and ever shall. 

Green groweth, etc. 



4 

WITHOUT dischord, 
And both accord, 
Now let us be ; 
Both hearts alone 
To set in one, 
Best seemeth me. 

For when a soul 
Is in the dole 

Of love's pain ; 
Then help must have 
Himself to save 

And love to obtain. 

Wherefore now we, 
That lovers be, 

Let us now pray ; 
Only love sure 
For to procure, 

Without denay. 



24 THE POETS ROYAL OF ENGLAND 

Where love so seweth 
There no heart rueth, 

But condescend ; 
If contrary, 
What remedy ? 

God it amend ! 



5 

THOUGH some say that youth ruleth me 
I trust in age to tarry, 
God and my right and my duty 
From them shall I never vary. 

I pray you all that aged be 
How well did you your youth carry ? 
I think some wars of each degree, 
There in a wager lay dare I 

Though some say, etc. 

Pastimes of youth some time among 
None can say are but necessary ; 
I hurt no man, I do no wrong, 
I love true where I did marry. 

Though some say, etc. 



KING HENRY THE EIGHTH 25 

Then so discuss that hence we must 
Pray to God and Saint Mary ; 
That all amend, and here an end, 
Thus saith the eighth King Harry. 
Though some say, etc. 

6 

WHOSO that will for grace sue 
His intent must needs be true, 
And love her in heart and deed 
Else it were pity that he should speed. 
Many say that love is ill, 
But those be they who have no skill ; 

Or else because they may not obtain 
They would that others should it disdain. 
But love is a thing given by God, 
In that therefore can be no odd, 
But perfect indeed and between two ; 
Wherefore then should we it eschew ? 

7 

WHERETO should I express 
My inward heaviness ? 
No mirth can make me fain 
Till that we meet again. 



26 THE POETS ROYAL OF ENGLAND 

Do way, dear heart, not so, 
Let no thought you dismay, 
Tho' ye now part me fro, 
We shall meet when we may. 

When I remember me 
Of your most gentle mind, 
It may in nowise agree 
That I should be unkind. 

The daisy delectable, 
The violet wan and bio, 
Ye are not variable, 
I love you and no moe. 

I make you fast and sure, 
It is to me great pain 
Thus long for to endure 
Till that we meet again. 



QUEEN ANNE BOLEYN 
1507-1536 

DEFILED is my name full sore, 
Through cruel spite and false report, 
That I may say for evermore, 

Farewell, my joy ! adieu comfort ! 
For wrongfully ye judge of me 

Unto my fame a mortal wound, 
Say what ye list, it will not be, 
Ye seek for that can not be found. 



28 THE POETS ROYAL OF ENGLAND 



XI 

GEORGE BOLEYN 
VISCOUNT ROCHEFORD 

Died 1536 

O DEATH, rock me asleep, 
Bring me a quiet rest, 
Let pass my weary guiltless ghost, 
Out of my careful breast. 
Toll on the passing bell, 
Ring out the doleful knell ; 
Thy sound my death abroad will tell, 
For I must die, 
There is no remedy. 

My pains who can express ? 
Alas, they are so strong ; 
My dolours will not suffer strength 
My life for to prolong. 
Toll on the passing bell ; 
Ring out the doleful knell ; 



GEORGE BOLEYN 29 

Thy sound my death abroad will tell, 
For I must die, 
There is no remedy. 



Alone, in prison strong, 

I wail my destiny. 
Woe worth this cruel hap that I 
Must taste this misery ! 
Toll on the passing bell ; 
Ring out the doleful knell ; 
Thy sound my death abroad will tell, 
For I must die, 
There is no remedy. 



Farewell, my pleasures past, 

Welcome, my present pain ! 
I feel my torment so increase 
That life cannot remain. 
Toll on the passing bell ; 
Ring out the doleful knell ; 
Thy sound my death abroad will tell, 
For I must die, 
There is no remedy. 



30 THE POETS ROYAL OF ENGLAND 

Cease now the passing bell, 

Ring out the doleful knoll, 
For thou my death dost tell. 
Lord, pity thou my soul ! 
Death doth draw nigh. 
Sound dolefully ; 
For now I die, 
I die, I die. 



SIR THOMAS SEYMOUR 31 



XII 

SIR THOMAS SEYMOUR, 
BARON SEYMOUR OF SUDLEY 

1508-1549 

FORGETTING God to love a king 
Hath been my rod, or else nothing 
In this frail life, being a blast 
Of care and strife till it be past. 
Yet God did call me, in my pride 
Lest I should falj, and from Him slide. 
For whom He loves He must correct, 
That they may be of His elect. 
Then, death, haste thee, thou shalt me gain 
Immortally with God to reign. 
Lord ! send the king like years as Noye, 
In governing this realm in joy ; 
And, after this frail life, such grace, 
That in Thy bliss he may find place. 



32 THE POETS ROYAL OF ENGLAND 



XIII 

THE LADIES ANNE, MARGARET AND 
JANE SEYMOUR 

THE TOMB OF MARGUERITE DE VALOIS, QUEEN 
OF NAVARRE 

by 

THE THREE SISTERS, ANNE, MARGARET AND JANE 
SEYMOUR 

A QUEEN, without peer 
In renown and holiness, 
First also in piety 
Marguerite sleeps here. 

Happy she who was found 

Ready and waiting, 

Her lamp full of oil, 

For the bridegroom's coming. 

Marguerite has deserted 
The prison of the body, 
Now she roams at will 
In the heavenly city. 



THE LADIES SEYMOUR 33 

With Saint Paul I would say, 
That the queen who sleeps here, 
Sleeps only to wake 
At the last day. 

She was held perfect 
By common consent, 
And common consent 
Is often true. 

What did she see on earth ? 
Sadness and bitter trouble ; 
Whereas now in Heaven 
She has joy eternal. 

To Christ she gave her soul 
Who deliver'd her from death ; 
For to die in Thee, O Christ, 
Is indeed to live. 

Her forehead here was crowned 

With diadem uncertain, 

The eternal Captain 

Has crowned her an immortal. 



34 THE POETS ROYAL OF ENGLAND 

Three times, distinct and loud, 
She called the name of Jesus, 
And Jesus answering thrice, 
Received her in His arms. 

Glory be to the Father, etc. 



THE LADIES SEYMOUR 35 

XIV 
KING EDWARD THE SIXTH 



UPON THIS SAYING OF AN ANTIENT DOCTOR OF 
CATHOLIKE CHURCH ; Dicimus Eucharistiam Panem vo- 
carl in Scripturis, Panis in quo Gratia actia stint y etc. 

IN Eucharist then there is bread, 
Whereto I do consent : 
Then with bread are our bodies fed ; 
And further what is meant ? 

St. Austin saith, the word doth come 

Unto the element ; 
And there is made, he saith, in sum, 

A perfect sacrament. 

The element doth then remain ; 

Or else must needs ensue, 
St. Austin's words be nothing plain, 

Nor cannot be found true. 



36 THE POETS ROYAL OF ENGLAND 

For if the word, as he doth say, 

Come to the element ; 
Then is not the element away, 

But bides there vtrament. 



Yet whoso eateth that lively food, 
And hath a perfect faith, 

Receiveth Christ's flesh and blood ; 
For Christ Himself so saith. 

Not with our teeth His flesh to tear, 
Nor take blood for our drink ; 

Too great an absurdity it were 
So grossly for to think. 

For we must eat Him spiritually, 

If we be spiritual : 
And whoso eats Him carnally, 

Thereby shall have a fall. 

For He is now a spiritual meat, 

And spiritually we must 
That spiritual meat spiritually eat, 

And leave our carnal lust. 



KING EDWARD THE SIXTH 37 

Thus by the Spirit, I spiritually 

Believe, say what men list ; 
None other transubstantiation I 

Believe of the Eucharist. 



But that there is both bread and wine 
Which we see with our eye ; 

Yet Christ is there by power Divine, 
To those that spiritually 

Do eat that bread and drink that cup, 

Esteeming it but light, 
As Judas did, which ate that sop 

Not judging it aright. 

For I was taught, not long agone, 

I should lean to the Spirit, 
And let the carnal flesh alone, 

For it doth not profit. 

God save him that teaching me taught, 

For I thereby do win 
To put from me that carnal thought 

That I before was in. 



3 8 THE POETS ROYAL OF ENGLAND 

For I believe Christ corporally 
In Heaven doth keep His place ; 

And yet Christ sacraraentally 
Is here with us by grace. 

So that in His high mystery 

We must eat spiritual meat, 
To keep His death in memory, 

Lest we should it forget. 

This do I say, this have I said, 

This saying say will I, 
This saying, though I once denayed, 

I will no more to die. 

It was in the same strain that Elizabeth wrote : 

CHRIST was the Word they spake it, 
He took the bread and brake it, 
And what His word did make it, 
That I believe and take it. 



LADY JANE GREY 39 

XV 

LADY JANE GREY (DUDLEY) 
1537-1553 

CERTAINE VERSES WRITTEN BY THE SAID LADIE 
JANE, WITH A PINNE 



N 



ON aliena putes homini quae obtingere possunt, 
Sors hodierna mihi, eras erit ilia tibi. 

JANE DUDLEY. 



2 

DEO juvante, nil nocet livor malus: 
Et non juvante, nil juvat labor gravis. 
Post tenebras spero lucem. 



nt non juvante, mi juvat 
Post tenebras spero lucem. 



TRANSLATIONS 

I 

WHATE'ER to man, as mortal, is assign'd, 
Should raise compassion, reader, in thy mind, 
Mourn others' woes and to thine own resign : 
That fate which I have found may soon be thine ! 

BALLARD. 



40 THE POETS ROYAL OF ENGLAND 



T 



O mortal's common fate thy mind resign, 
My lot to-day, to-morrow may be thine. 

SEWARD. 



WHILE God assists us, envy bites in vain ; 
If God forsake us, fruitless all our pain 
After darkness I hope for light again. 

BALLARD. 



T 



QUEEN ELIZABETH 41 

XVI 

QUEEN ELIZABETH 
1533-1603 

i 

HE doubt of future foes exiles my present joy, 
And wit me warns to shun such snares as 
threaten mine annoy. 



For falsehood now doth flow, and subjects' faith doth 

ebb, 
Which would not be if reason rul'd, or wisdom wove 

the webb. 

But clouds of joys untried do cloak aspiring minds, 
Which turn to rain of late repent by course of changed 
winds. 

The top of hope supposed the root of ruth will be, 
And fruitless all their grafFed guiles, as shortly all 
shall see. 

Then dazzled eyes with pride, which great ambition 

blinds, 
Shall be unseal'd by worthy wights whose foresight 

falshood finds. 



42 THE POETS ROYAL OF ENGLAND 

The daughter of debate that discord aye doth sow, 
Shall reap no gain where former rule hath taught still 
peace to grow. 

No foreign banish'd wight shall anchor in this port, 
Our realm it brooks no stranger's force, let them 
elsewhere resort. 



Our rusty sword with rest shall first his edge employ, 
To poll the tops that seek such change, or gape for 
such like joy. 



Q. ELIZABETH'S VERSES, WHILE PRISONER AT 
WOODSTOCK 

Writ with charcoal on a shutter. 

OH, Fortune ! how thy restless wavering state 
Hath frought with cares my troubled wit ! 
Witness this present prison, whither fate 
Could bear me, and the joys I quit. 



QUEEN ELIZABETH 43 

Thou causedest the guilty to be loosed 
From bands, wherein are innocents inclosed : 
Causing the guiltless to be straight reserved, 
And freeing those that death hath well deserved. 
But by her envy can be nothing wrought, 
So God send to my foes all they have thought. 

A.D. MDLV. ELIZABETHE, PRISONNER. 



I GRIEVE, and dare not show my discontent ; 
I love, and yet am forc'd to seem to hate ; 
I do, yet dare not say I ever meant ; 

I seem stark mute, but inwardly do prate ; 
I am, and not ; I freeze, and yet am burn'd ; 
Since from myself, my other self I turn'd. 

My care is like my shadow in the sun, 

Follows me flying, flies when I pursue it ; 
Stands and lies by me, doth what I have done ; 
His too familiar care doth make me rue it : 
No means I find to rid him from my breast, 
Till by the end of things it be supprest. 



44 THE POETS ROYAL OF ENGLAND 

Some gentle passions slide into my mind, 

For I am soft, and made of melting snow ; 
Or be more cruel, Love, and so be kind, 
Let me or float, or sink, be high or low ; 

Or let me live with some more sweet content; 
Or die, and so forget what love e'er meant. 

ELIZA REGINA upon Monsieur's departure. 



KING JAMES THE FIRST 45 

XVII 

KING JAMES THE FIRST 
1566-1625 



A SONNET 

ADDRESSED BY KlNG JAMES TO HIS SON PRINCE HENRY 

GOD gives not kings the style of gods in vain, 
For on His throne His sceptre do they sway ; 
And as their subjects ought them to obey, 
So kings should fear and serve their God again. 
If then ye would enjoy a happy reign, 
Observe the statutes of our Heavenly King ; 
And from His law make all your laws to spring ; 
Since His lieutenant here ye should remain : 
Reward the just, be stedfast, true, and plain ; 
Repress the proud, maintaining aye the right ; 
Walk always so as ever in His sight 
Who guards the godly, plaguing the profane. 
And so ye shall in princely virtues shine, 
Resembling right your mighty King Divine. 



46 THE POETS ROYAL OF ENGLAND 



2 

A SONNET 

OCCASIONED BY THE BAD WEATHER WHICH HINDERED 
THE SPORTS AT NEWMARKET, IN JANUARY l6l6 

HOW cruelly these captives do conspire ! 
What loathsome love breeds such a baleful band 

Betwixt the canker'd King of Creta land, 

That melancholy, old, and angry sire, 

And him, who wont to quench debate and ire, 

Among the Romans when his ports were clos'd ! 

But now his double face is still dispos'd, 

With Saturn's help to freeze us at the fire. 

The earth o'er-covered with a sheet of snow, 

Refuses food to fowl, to bird, and beast ; 

The chilling cold lets everything to grow, 

And surfeits cattle with a starving feast. 

Curs'd be that love, and may't continue short, 
Which kills all creatures, and doth spoil our sport. 



KING JAMES THE FIRST 47 

3 

THE DEDICATION OF THE BOOK 

LO ! here, my son, a mirror vive and fair 
Which showeth the shadow of a worthy king ; 
Lo ! here a book a pattern doth you bring, 
Which you should press to follow maire and maire. 
This trusty friend the truth will never spare, 
But give a good advice unto you hear : 
How it should be your chief and princely care 
To follow virtue, vice to forbear : 
And in this book your lesson shall you learn, 
For guiding of your people, great and small : 
Then, as you ought, give an attentive ear, 
And panse how you these precepts practise shall. 
Your father bids you study here, and read 
How to become a perfect king indeed ! 



4 

THE facound Greek, Demosthenes by name, 
His tongue was once into his youth so slow, 
As even that art, which flourish made his fame, 
He scarce could name it for a time, ye know. 



48 THE POETS ROYAL OF ENGLAND 

So of small seeds the Libian cedars grow : 
So of one egg the eagle doth proceed : 
From fountains small great Nilus flood doth flow : 
Even so of rawns do mighty fishes breed. 
Therefore, good reader, when as thou dost read 
These my first fruits, dispute them not at all : 
Who knows but these may able be indeed 
Of finer poems the beginning small. 

Then rather loaue my meaning and my pains, 
Than lak my dull ingyne and blunted brains. 



5 

THE nations banded 'gainst the Lord of might 
Prepar'd a force, and set them to the way : 
Mars dres'd himself in such an awful plight, 
The like whereof was never seen, they say : 
They forward came in monsterous array, 
Both sea and land beset was everywhere : 
Brags threat'ned us a ruinous decay, 
What came of that ? the issue did declare. 
The winds began to toss them here and there, 
The seas began in foaming waves to swell : 



KING JAMES THE FIRST 49 

The number that escap'd, it fell them fair : 
The rest were swallowed up in gulfs of hell : 

But how were all these things miraculous done ? 

God laugh'd at them out of His heavenly throne.. 



ANE SCHORT POEME ON TYME 

AS I was pansing in the morning air, 
And could not sleep, nor nowise take my rest, 
Forth for to walk, the morning was so fair, 
Athwart the fields, it seemed to me the best. 
The east was clear whereby belyne I guess'd 
That firy Titan coming was in sight, 
Obscuring chaste Diana by his light. 

Who by his rising in the azure skies, 
Did duly else all them on earth do dwell. 
The balmy dew through burning drought he dries, 
Which made the soil to savour sweet and smell, 
By dew that on the night before down fell, 
Which then was soak'd by the Delphiennes heat 
Up in the air, it was so light and wet. 

E 



50 THE POETS ROYAL OF ENGLAND 

Whose high ascending in his purple sphere 

Provoked all from Morpheus to flee : 

As beasts to feed, and birds to sing with beir, 

Men to their labour, buisy as the bee : 

Yet idle men deuysing did I see. 

How for to dryue the time that did them irk, 

And sundry pastimes which that it grew mirk. 



Then wondered I to see them seek a while, 
So willingly the precious time to tyne : 
And how they did themselves so far beguile, 
To fashe of time, which of itself is fyne. 
From time be past, to call it backward syne 
Is but in vain : therefore men should be warr 
To sleuth the time that flees from them so farr. 



For what hath man but time into this life, 
Which gives him days his God aright to know : 
Wherefore then should we be at such a strife, 
So speedily ourselves for to withdraw 
Even from the time which is in nowise slow 
To flee from us, suppose we fled it nought ? 
More wise we were, if we the time had sought. 



KING JAMES THE FIRST 51 

But since that time is such a precious thing, 

I would we should bestow it unto that 

Which were most pleasant to our heavenly King. 

Flee ydilteth, which is the greatest lat. 

But since that death to all is destinat, 

Let us employ that time that God hath sent us, 

In doing well, that good men may commend us. 

Haec quoque perficiat, quod perficit omnia, Tempus. 



52 THE POETS ROYAL OF ENGLAND 

XVIII 

PRINCESS ELIZABETH STUART 

QUEEN OF BOHEMIA 

1596-1662 

THIS is joy ! this is true pleasure, 
If we best things make our treasure, 
And enjoy them at full leisure, 
Evermore in richest measure. 

God only is excellent ! 
Let up to Him our love be sent, 
Whose desires are set or bent 
On aught else shall much repent. 

Theirs is a wretched case, 
Who themselves so far disgrace, 
That they their affections place 
Upon things nam'd vile and base. 

Earthly things do fade, decay, 
Constant to us not one day ; 
Suddenly they pass away, 
And we cannot make them stay. 



PRINCESS ELIZABETH STUART 53 

All the vast world doth contain, 
To content man's heart, are vain, 
That still justly will complain, 
And unsatisfied remain. 



Why should vain joys us transport ? 
Early pleasures are but short, 
And are mingled in such sort, 
Griefs are greater than the sport. 

God, most Holy, high, and great ! 
Our delight doth make complete 
When in us He takes His seat, 
Only then we are replete. 

O ! my soul, of Heavenly birth, 
Do thou scorn this basest earth, 
Place not here thy joy and mirth, 
Where of bliss is greatest dearth. 

From below thy mind remove, 
And affect the things above ; 
Set thy heart, and fix thy love, 
Where thou truest joys shalt prove. 



54 THE POETS ROYAL OF ENGLAND 

To me grace, O Father]! send, 
On Thee wholly to depend 
That all may to Thy glory tend ; 
So let me live, so let me end. 



KING CHARLES THE FIRST 55 



XIX 

KING CHARLES THE FIRST 
1600-1649 



ON A QUIET CONSCIENCE 

CLOSE thine eyes and sleep secure, 
Thy soul is safe, thy body sure : 
He that guards thee, He that keeps, 
Never slumbers, never sleeps ! 
A quiet Conscience, in a quiet breast, 
Has only peace, has only rest. 
The music and the mirth of kings 
Are out of tune, unless she sings 
Then close thine eyes in peace, and rest secure, 
No sleep so sweet as thine, no rest so sure. 



56 THE POETS ROYAL OF ENGLAND 



MAJESTY IN MISERY; OR. AN IMPLORATION TO THE 
KING OF KINGS : WRITTEN BY HIS LATE MAJESTY 
KING CHARLES THE FIRST, IN HIS DURANCE AT 
CARISBROKE CASTLE, 1648 

GREAT Monarch of the world, from Whose 
pow'r springs 

The potency and fjonlyj power of kings, 
Record the royal woe my suffering sings ; 

And teach my tongue, that ever did confine 

Its faculties in truth's seraphic line, 

To track the treasons of Thy foes and mine. 

Nature and law, by Thy Divine decree, 
(The only root of righteous royalty) 
With this dim diadem invested me : 

With it, the sacred sceptre, purple robe, 
The holy unction, and the royal globe : 
Yet am I levell'd with the life of Job. 

The fiercest furies that do daily tread 
Upon my grief, my grey discrowned head, 
Are those that owe my bounty for their bread. 



KING CHARLES THE FIRST 57 

They raise a war, and christen it " The Cause," 
While sacrilegious hands have best applause, 
Plunder and murder are the kingdom's laws ; 

Tyranny bears the title of taxation, 
Revenge and robbery are reformation, 
Oppression gains the name of sequestration. 

My loyal subjects, who in this bad season 
Attend me (by the Law of God and reason), 
They dare impeach and punish for " high treason." 

Next at the clergy do their furies frown, 

Pious episcopacy must be put down, 

They will destroy the crosier and the crown. 

Churchmen are chain'd, and schismatics are freed, 
Mechanics preach, and holy fathers bleed, 
The crown is crucified with the creed. 

The Church of England doth all factions foster, 
The pulpit is usurp'd by each impostor, 
Extempore excludes the Paternoster. 

The Presbyter and Independent seed 

Springs with broad blades. To make religion bleed 

Herod and Pontius Pilate are agreed. 



58 THE POETS ROYAL OF ENGLAND 

The corner stone's misplac'd by every pavier ; 
With such a bloody method and behaviour 
Their ancestors did crucify our Saviour. 

My royal consort, from whose fruitful womb 
So many princes legally have come, 
Is forc'd in pilgrimage to seek a tomb. 

Great Britain's heir is forced into France, 
Whilst on his father's head his foes advance : 
Poor child ! he weeps out his inheritance. 

With my own power my majesty they wound, 
In the king's name the king himself* s uncrown'd : 
So doth the dust destroy the diamond. 

With propositions daily they enchant 
My people's ears, such as do reason daunt, 
And the Almighty will not let me grant. 

They promise to erect my royal stem, 
To make me great, t' advance my diadem 
If I will first fall down and worship them ! 

But for refusal they devour my thrones, 
Distress my children, and destroy my bones ; 
I fear they'll force me to make bread of stones. 



KING CHARLES THE FIRST 59 

My life they prize at such a slender rate 
That in my absence they draw bills of hate, 
To prove the king a " tray tor " to the state. 

Felons obtain more privilege than I : 
They are allow' d to answer ere they die ; 
'Tis death for me to ask the reason why. 

But, Sacred Saviour, with Thy words I woo 

Thee to forgive, and not be bitter to 

Such as Thou know'st do not know what they do. 

For since they from their Lord are so disjointed, 
As to condemn those edicts he appointed, 
How can they prize the power of His anointed ? 

Augment my patience, nullify my hate, 
Preserve my issue, and inspire my mate, 
Yet, though we perish, BLESS THE CHURCH AND STATE. 



60 THE POETS ROYAL OF ENGLAND 

XX 

KING CHARLES THE SECOND 
1630-1685 

I PASS all my hours in a shady old grove, 
But I live not the day when I see not my love : 
I survey every walk now my Phil is is gone, 
And sigh when I think we were there all alone. 
O then 'tis I think there's no hell 
Like loving too well. 

But each shade and each conscious bow'r when I find, 
Where I once have been happy, and she has been kind ; 
When I see the print left of her shape on the green, 
I imagine the pleasure may yet come agen. 

O then 'tis I think no joys are above 

The pleasures of love. 

While alone to myself I repeat all her charms, 
She I love may be lock'd in another man's arms ; 
She may laugh at my cares, and so false she may be, 
To say all the kind thoughts she before said to me. 

O then 'tis, O then, that I think there's no hell 

Like loving too well. 



KING CHARLES THE SECOND 61 

But when I consider the truth of her heart, 
Such an innocent passion, so kind without art ; 
I fear I have wrong'd her, and hope she may be 
So full of true love to be jealous of me. 

O then 'tis I think that no joys are above 

The pleasures of love. 



62 THE POETS ROYAL OF ENGLAND 



XXI 

EDWARD HYDE 

EARL OF CLARENDON 

1608-1674 

i 

To HIS FRIEND MR. WlLLIAM D'AvENANT 

WHY should the fond ambition of a friend, 
With such industrious accents strive to lend 
A prologue to thy worth ? Can aught of mine 
Enrich thy volume ? Th* hast rear'd thyself a shrine 
Will out-live pyramids : marble pillars shall, 
Ere thy great muse, receive a funeral. 
Thy wit hath purchas'd such a patron's name 
To deck thy front, as must derive to fame 
These tragic raptures, and indent with eyes 
To spend hot tears t' inrich the sacrifice. 

ED. HYDE. 



EARL OF CLARENDON 63 



ON THE DEATH OF DR. DONNE 

I CANNOT blame those men that knew thee well, 
Yet dare not help the world to ring thy knell 
In tuneful elegies ; there's not language known 
Fit for thy mention, but t' was first thy own ; 
The epitaphs thou writ'st have so bereft 
Our tongue of wit, there is no fancy left 
Enough to weep thee ; what henceforth we see 
Of art or nature, must result from thee. 
There may perchance some busy gathering friend 
Steal from thy own works, and that, varied, lend 
Which thou bestow'st on others, to thy hearse, 
And so thou shalt live still in thine own verse ; 
He that shall venture farther, may commit 
A pitied error, show his zeal, not wit. 
Fate hath done mankind wrong ; Virtue may aim 
Reward of conscience, never can, of fame ; 
Since her great trumpet's broke, could only give 
Faith to the world, command it to believe : 
He then must write, that would define thy parts, 
Here lies the best divinity all the arts. 

EDW. HYDE. 



THE POETS ROYAL OF 
SCOTLAND 



THE POETS ROYAL OF 
SCOTLAND 

XXII 
KING JAMES THE FIRST 

1394-1437 

i 

HEIREFTER FOLLOWIS THE QUAIR MAID BE KING 
JAMES OF SCOTLAND THE FIRST CALLIT THE 
KINGIS QUAIR AND MAID QUHEN HIS MAJESTIE 
WES IN INGLAND 



IN Vere, that full of vertu is and gude, 
Quhen nature first begynneth hir enprise, 
That quhilum was be cruell frost and flude 
And schouris scharp opprest in many wyse, 
And Cynthius fjbe^gynneth to aryse 

Heigh in the est, a morow soft and suete, 
Upward his course to drive in Ariete. 
67 



68 THE POETS ROYAL OF SCOTLAND 

Passit myd-day hot foure greis evin, 

Off lenth and brede his angel wingis bryght 
He spred upon the ground, doun fro the hevin, 
That, for gladnesse and confort of the sight, 
And with the tiklyng of his hete and light, 
The tender flouris opnyt thame and sprad, 
And, in thair nature, thankit him for glad. 



Noght fer passit the state of innocence 

Bot nere about the nowmer of yeris thre, 
Were it causit throu hevinly influence 
OfF Goddis will, or othir casualtee, 
Can I noght say ; bot oute of my contree, 
By thair avise that had of me the cure, 
Be see to pas, tuke I myn aventure. 



Purvait of all that was us necessarye, 

With wynd at will, up airly by the morowe, 
Streight unto schip, no longere wold we tarye ; 
The way we tuke, the tyme I tald to-forowe, 
With mony * fare wele,' and ' Sanct Johne to borowe ' 
OfF falowe and frende ; and thus with one assent 
We pullit up saile, and furth our wayis went. 



KING JAMES THE FIRST 69 

Upon the wawis weltering to and fro, 

So infortunate was us that fremyt day, 
That maugre, playnly, quhethir we wold or no, 
With strong hand, [JasJ by forse, schortly to say, 
Off inymyis takin and led away 

We weren all, and broght in thaire contree ; 
Fortune it schupe non othir wayis to be. 



Quhare as in strayte ward and in strong prisoun, 

So fer-forth, of my lyf the hevy lyne, 
Without confort, in sorowe abandoun, 
The secund sistere lukit hath to twyne 
Nere by the space of yeris twie's nyne ; 
Till Jupiter his merci list advert, 
And send confort in relesche of my smert. 



Quhare as in ward full oft I wold bewaille 

My dedely lyf, full of peyne and penance, 
Saing ryght thus, quhat have I gilt to faille 
My fredome in this warld and my plesance ? 
Sen every wight has thereof suffisance 
That I behold, and I a creature 
Put from all this hard is myn aventure ! 



70 THE POETS ROYAL OF SCOTLAND 

The bird, the beste, the fisch eke in the see, 

They lyve in fredome everich in his kynd ; 
And I a man, and lakkith libertee ; 

Quhat sail I seyne, quhat resoun may I fynd, 
That fortune suld do so ? thus in my mynd 
My folk I wold argewe, hot all for noght ; 
Was none that myght, that on my peynes rought. 



Than wold I say, " Gif God me had devisit 
To lyve my lyf in thraldom thus and pyne, 
Quhat was the cause that He more \jne] comprisit 
Than othir folk to lyve in suich ruyne ? 
I suffer allone amang the figuris nyne, 

Ane wofull wrecche that to no wight may spede, 
And yit of every lyvis help hath nede." 



The long^e] dayes and the nyghtis eke, 

I wold bewaille my fortune in this wise. 
For quhich, agane distresse confort to seke, 
My custum was on mornis for to ryse 
Airly as day ; O happy excercise ! 

By the^ej come I to joye out of turment ! 
Bot now to purpose of my first entent. 



KING JAMES THE FIRST 71 

Bewailing in my chamber thus allone, 
Dispeired of all joye and remedye, 
For-tirit of my thoght and wo-begone, 
Un-to the wyndow gan I walk in hye, 
To see the warld and folk that went forby : 
As for the tyme, though I of mirthis fude 
Myght have no more, to luke it did me gude. 



Now was there maid fast by the touris wall 

A gardyn faire, and in the corneris set 
Ane herbere grene, with wandis long and small 
Railit about ; and so with treis set 
Was all the place, and hawthorn hegis knet, 
That lyfe was non, walking there forby, 
That myght within scarce ony wight aspye. 



So thik the bewis and the leves grene 

Beschadit all the aleyes that there were ; 
And myddis every herbere myght be sene 
The scharpQe] grene suete jenepere 
Growing so fair with branchis here and there, 
That, as it semyt to a lyf without, 
The bewis spred the herbere all about ; 



72 THE POETS ROYAL OF SCOTLAND 

And on the small [e] grene twistis sat 

The lytill suete nyghtingale, and song 
So loud and clere, the ympnis consecrat 
Off luvis use, now soft, now lowd among, 
That all the gardyng and the wallis rong 

Ryght of thaire song, and on the copill next 
Off thaire suete armony ; and lo ! the text : 



" Worshippe, ye that loveris bene, this May, 
For of your bliss the kalendis are begonne, 
And sing with us, Away ! Winter, away ! 

Cum, Somer, cum ! the suete sesoun and sonne ! 
Awake, for shame ! that have your hevynnis wonne ; 
And amorously lift up your hedis all, 
Thank Lufe, that list you to his merci call.' ' 

Quhen thai this song had sung a lytill thrawe, 
Thai stent a quhile, and therewith unaffraid, 
As I beheld and kest myn eyen a-lawe, 

From beugh to beugh they hippit and thai plaid, 
And freschly, in thair birdis kynd, arraid 

Thaire fetheris new, and fret thame in the sonne, 
And thankit Lufe that had thair makis wonne. 



KING JAMES THE FIRST 73 

This was the plane ditee of thaire note, 

And therewithall unto my self I thoght : 
* Quhat lyf is this, that maids birdis dote ? 

Quhat may this be, how cummyth it of ought ? 
Quhat nedith it to be so dere ybought ? 
It is nothing, trowe I, bot feynit chere, 
And that men list to counterfeten chere.' 



This truly royal poem concludes : 



Vnto Cthe] impnis of my maisteris dere, 

Gotvere and Chaucere, that on the steppis satt 
Of rethorike, quhill thai were lyvand here, 
Superlative as poetis laureate, 
In moralitee and eloquence ornate, 
I recommend my buk in lynis sevin, 
And eke thair saulis unto the blisse of hevin. 

AMEN ! 

EXPLICIT, &c. &c. 
Quod Jacobus Primus Scotorum Rex Illustrisstmus. 



74 THE POETS ROYAL OF SCOTLAND 

2 

GOOD COUNSEL 

SEN throw vertew incressis dignitie, 
And vertew is flour and rule of noblesse ay, 
Of ony wit, or quhat estait thow be, 

His steppis follow, and dreid for none efFray : 
Eject vice, and follow treuth alway : 
Lufe maist thy God that first thy lufe began, 
And for ilk inche He will the quyte ane span. 

Be not ouir proude in thy prosperite, 
For as it cummis, sa will it pas away ; 

Thy tyme to compt is schort, thow may weill se, 
For of grene gress sone cummis wallowit hay. 
Labour in treuth, quhilk suith is of thy fay ; 

Traist maist in God, for He best gyde the can, 

And for ilk inche He will the quyte ane span. 

Sen word is thrall, and thocht is only fre, 

Thou dant thy toung, that power hes and may, 

Thou steik thy ene fra warldis vanitie : 
Refraine thy lust, and harkin quhat I say : 
Graip or thow slyde, and keip furth the hie way, 

Thow hald the fast upon thy God and man, 

And for ilk inche He will the quyte ane span. 
Quod King James the First. 



MARGARET STUART 75 



XXIII 

MARGARET STUART 

QUEEN OF FRANCE 

1425-1445 

INCIPIT LAMENTATIO DOMINI DALPHINI PRO MORTE 
UXORIS SVJE, DICTVE MARGARETS 

THEE, mychti Makar of the major monde, 
Quhilk reuly rollis thir hevinly regions round 
About this erd, be mocioune circuler, 
Ger all the cloudis of the hevin habound, 
And souk up all thir watteris hal and sounde, 
Baith of salt sea, of burne, well and revere, 
Syne to descende in trigland teris tere, 
To weip with me this wofull waymenting, 
This petwys playnt of a princes but peir, 
Quhilk dulfull deed has tane till his duelling. 

Fill burnis, wellis, reveris, and fountayns, 
Baith stankis and louchis and waleis of montayns, 
Of clowdis of sorow, of anger, and distres, 
And baith my hart, in endless wo that payns, 
For derfnes and dispyt of deed nocht fayns. 



76 THE POETS ROYAL OF SCOTLAND 

Quhilk as was reft sa ryal a riches, 
Wes never yit more gret pete of a princes, 
In quhome regnyt QheJ floure of nobilite ; 
Helpe to murne, and murne hir mare and les, 
Quhilk for diseis dayly but dreid I dee. 



Ger all the ayre that in hycht above is, 

And all the wyndis that under the hevyne amovis, 

Turn all in sobbyng and in sichyng sore, 

Ger all thir foulis that melody contruvis, 

And all thir birdis that syngand heir for luveis, 

Turne all thair joy to soro and in score, 

And help to murn this dul my lady foore, 

And wary weird, quhilk banyst as of France 

The mirrour of vertu and waldis glore, 

Quhilk deed has reft but reuth or repentance. 



God of nature, quhilk all this eird honouris 
With fruyt and fulye, with herbe, fluriss and flouris, 
Fair flurisand and freshe in thair verdoure, 
Of quhilk the fleuvir to the hevyne retournis, 
And al the frechuess of thir faire figouris, 
Yeildis thaim and wourchip to thair Creatoure, 



MARGARET STUART 77 

Defaid thaire freshnes for thi gret valoure, 
And turn in blakynge all thaire lustines, 
Heil never this erde more with plesand coloure, 
Quhill we have murnyt the dull of our mastres. 

Turne all in blak that aire was fresche of hew, 
And in murnynge all myrth, musik and glew ; 
Owre fyle the sone with myst and with merkes, 
Ger every wy that are of luffe wess trew 
Haf mynd of my regret and on me rew, 
And stanche in erde all solace and blythnes ; 
Turne all at is blythe in breith and villnes, 
And in murning all myrth and melody ; 
Quhill we have murnyt the dule of our mastres 
Lat nature thole no kynge leife heire gladly. 



78 THE POETS ROYAL OF SCOTLAND 

XXIV 

KING JAMES THE FIFTH 
1512-1542 

THE GABERLUNVIE MAN 

THE pauky aulde carle came ovir the lee, 
Wi' mony good-e'ens and days to mee, 
Saying, " Good-wife, for your courtesie, 

Will ye lodge a silly poor man ? " 
The night was cauld, the carle was wat, 
And down ayont the ingle he sat ; 
My dochter's shoulders he gan to clap, 
And cadgily ranted and sang. 

" O wow ! " quo he, " were I as free, 
As first when I saw this countrie, 
How blyth and merry wad I bee, 

And I wad nevir think lang." 
He grew canty, and she grew fain, 
But little did her auld ninny ken, 
What thir slee twa togither were sayn, 

When wooing they were so thrang. 



KING JAMES THE FIFTH 79 

" And O ! " quo he, " ann ye were as black 
As evir the crown o' your dadye's hat, 
'Tis I wad lay thee by my back, 

And awa wi' me thou sould gang ! " 
"And O ! " quoth she, "ann I were as whyte 
As evir the snaw lay on the dike, 
lid dead me braw and lady-like, 

And awa wi' thee lid gang ! " 

Between the twa was made a plot ; 
They raise a wee before the cock, 
And wyliely they shot the lock, 

And fast to the bent are they gane. 
Up the morn the auld wife raise, 
And at her leisure put on her claiths ; 
Syne to the servant's bed she gaes, 

To speir for the silly poor man. 

She gaed to the bed whair the beggar lay, 

The strae was cauld, he was away ; 

She clapt her hands, cryd, " Dulefu' day ! 

For some of our geir will be gane." 
Some ran to coffer, and some to kist, 
But nought was stown that could be mist. 
She dancid her lane, cryd, "Praise be blest, 

I have lodg'd a leal poor man." 



8o THE POETS ROYAL OF SCOTLAND 

" Since naithing's awa, as we can learn, 

The kirn's to kirn, and milk to earn ; 

Gae butt the house, lass, and waken my bairn 

And bid her come quickly ben." 
The servant gaed where the dochter lay, 
The sheets were cauld, she was away ; 
And fast to her good wife can say, 

" She's aff with the gaberlunyie man." 

" O fy gar ride, and fy gar rin, 

And haste ye, find these traitors agen ; 

For shee's be burnt, and hee's be slein, 

The wearyfou gaberlunyie man." 
Some rade upo' horse, some ran a fit, 
The wife was wood, and out o' her wit ; 
She could na gang, nor yet could she sit, 

But ay did curse and did ban. 

Mean-time far hind, out owre the lee, 
Fu* snug in a glen, where nane could see, 
The twa, with kindlie sport and glee, 

Cut frae a new cheese a whang. 
The priving was gude, it pleas'd them baith, 
To lo'e her for ay he gae her his aith ; 
Quo she, " To leave thee I will be laith, 

My winsome gaberlunyie man." 



KING JAMES THE FIFTH 81 

*' O kend my ninny I were wi you, 
Illfardly wad she crook her mou' ; 
Sic a poor man she'ld nevir trow, 

Aftir the gaberlunyie man." 
" My dear," quo he, '< yeer'e yet owre yonge, 
And hae na learnt the beggar's tonge, 
To follow me frae toun to toun, 

And carrie the gaberlunyie on." 

" Wi' kauk and keel, I'll win your bread, 
And spindles and whorles for them wha need, 
Whilk is a gentil trade indeed 

The gaberlunyie to carrie O ! 
I'll bow my leg and crook my knee, 
And draw a black clout owre my e'e ; 
A cripple or blind they will cau me, 

While we sail sing and be merry O ! " 



82 THE POETS ROYAL OF SCOTLAND 

XXV 

QUEEN MARY 

( MARY, QUEEN OF SCOTS') 

1542-1587 



DOMINE Deus ! speravi in te : 
'O care mi Jesu ! nunc libera me. 
In dura catena, in misera paenh, desidero te ; 
Languendo, gemendo, et genu flectendo, 
Adoro, imploro, ut liberes me. 

TRANSLATION 

My Lord and my God, I have trusted in Thee, 

dearest Lord Jesus, now liberate me ! 

Oppressed by this chain, 
And wretched with pain, 
Still languishing, groaning and bending the knee, 

1 adore Thee, implore Thee, now liberate me. 

w. w. SKEAT. 



QUEEN MARY 83 



TRANSLATION 
2 

WHILE, in a tone of deepest woe, 
My sweetly mournful warblings flow, 
I wildly cast my eyes around, 
Feel my dread loss, my bosom wound, 
And see, in sigh succeeding sigh, 
The finest moments of my life to fly. 

Did destiny's hard hand before, 
Of miseries such a store, 
Of such a train of sorrows shed 
Upon a happy woman's head ? 
Who sees her very heart and eye 
Or in the bier, or in the coffin lie. 

Who, in the morning of my day, 

And midst my flowers of youth most gay, 

Feel all the wretchedness at heart, 

That heaviest sorrows can impart ; 

And can in nothing find relief 

But in the fond indulgence of my grief. 



84 THE POETS ROYAL OF SCOTLAND 

What once of joy could lend a strain, 

Is now converted into pain ; 

The day that shines with fullest light 

Is now to me a darksome night ; 

Nor is there aught of highest joys, 

That now my soul will condescend to prize. 



Full at my heart and in my eye 
A portrait and an image lie, 
That figure out my dress ot woe, 
And my pale face reflected show, 
The semblance of the violets blue, 
Unhappy love's own genuine hue. 

To ease my sorely troubled mind, 
I keep to no one spot confined, 
But think it good to shift my place, 
In hopes my sadness to efface ; 
For now is worse, now best again, 
The most sequestrate solitary scene. 

Whether I shelter in the grove, 
Or in the open meadow rove ; 



QUEEN MARY 85 

Whether the morn is dawning day, 
Or evening shoots its level ray ; 
My heart's incessant feelings prove 
My heavy mourning for my absent love. 

If at a time towards the skies, 

I cast my sorrow-dripping eyes, 

I see his eyes sweet-glancing play 

Amongst the clouds in every ray, 

Then in the clouds dark water view, 

His hearse display'd in sorrow's sable hue. 

If to repose my limbs apply, 
And slumbering on my couch I lie ; 
I hear his voice to me rejoin, 
I feel his body touching mine ; 
Engaged at work, to rest applied, 
I have him still for ever at my side. 

No other object meets my sight 
However fair it seems or bright, 
To which my heart will e'er consent 
To yield itself in fond content, 
And robb'd of the perfection be 
Of this impassion'd mournful sympathy 



86 THE POETS ROYAL OF SCOTLAND 

But here, my song, do thou refrain 
From my most melancholy strain, 
Of which shall this the burden prove ; 
* My honest heart-full lively love, 
Howe'er I am, by death disjoin'd, 
Shall never, never diminution find.' 



LORD DARNLEY 87 

XXVI 

HENRY STEWART, LORD DARNLEY 

1546-1567 
DARNLEY'S BALLAD 

GIFE langour makis men licht, 
Or dolour thame decoir, 
In erth thair is no wicht 
May me compair in gloir. 
Gif cairful thoftis restoir 
My havy hairt frome sorrow, 

I am, for evir moir, 
In joy, both evin and morrow. 

Gif pleser be to pance, 

I playnt me nocht opprest, 
Or absence micht avance, 

My hairt is haill possest : 

Gif want of quiet rest 
From cairis micht me convoy, 

My mynd is nocht mollest, 
Bot evir moir in joy. 



88 THE POETS ROYAL OF SCOTLAND 

Thocht that I pance in paine 

In passing to and fro, 
I labour all in vane, 

For so hes mony mo 

That hes nocht servit so, 
In suting of thair sweit ; 

The nare the fyre I go, 
The grittar is my heit. 



The turtour for hir maik 
Mair dule may nocht indure 

Nor I do for hir saik, 

Evin hir quha hes in cure 
My hairt, quilk sal be sure 

And servis to the deid, 
Unto that lady pure, 

The well of womanheid. 



Schaw, schedull, to that sueit, 
My pairt so permanent, 

That no mirth, quhill we meit, 
Sail cause me be content : 
But still, my hairt, lament, 



LORD DARNLEY 89 

In sorrowfull eiching soir, 

Till tyme scho be present ; 
Fairweill ! I say no moir. 

Quoth KING HENRY STEWART. 



NOTES 



i 

THIS passage, translated from the Old English by Professor 
Gollancz, is a famous and noteworthy interpolation by King 
Alfred in his Old English Version of Boethius. The extant 
works of King Alfred testify to his enthusiasm for Litera 
ture, and to his efforts to provide his people with the chief 
literature regarded as classic in his day. We know, too, 
that he was a lover of poetry and a poet himself. He is 
seen, perhaps, in his best in his prose. The Old English 
poetical version of the metres of Boethius may be by him, 
but opinion is divided on the subject. 



II 

A song in the Provencal tongue. Printed : La Tour 
Tenebreuse, et les Jours Lumineux, Contes Angloises, ac- 
compagnez d'Historiettes, et tirez d'une ancienne Chronique 
composee par Richard, surnomme Occur de Lion, Roy 
d'Angleterre ; 1705. Also, Catalogus Codicum MSS. 
Bibliothecae Bernensis. Also, Histoire Litteraire des Trou 
badours ; 1774. Translations : A General History of 
Music, C. Burney, Mus. Doc., 1789. Also, G. Ellis in 
9 1 



92 NOTES 

Walpole's Catalogue of the Royal and Noble Authors of 
England, Scotland and Ireland, ed. T. Park ; 1806. ''These 
lines" [i.e. the last stanza] "are absolutely unintelligible, 
and probably from some error of the copyist." Ellii. 



Ill 

Manuscript copy formerly at the College of Heralds, not 
now available. Printed : Translation : History of Edward 
III, Joshua Barnes, 1688. (Fabyan's Chronicle gives an 
extremely loose, vague rendering.) "The very Verses I 
have hitherto annexed, faithfully translated from his own, 
which are in Latin, and in rhyme, after the manner of that 
age. " Barnes, 



IV 

A selection, the entire poem extending to thirty-four 
stanzas. Printed: Horda Angel-cynnan, or Manners and 
Customs of the English, etc. J. Strutt; 1775-76. Also, 
Park's Walpole's Catalogue. " Excellent Sovereign," 1. i. ; 
presumed to be Joanna, widow of Henry IV. 



Printed : Nugz Antiquz, Sir John Harington, ed. T. 
Park; 1804. "The verse I did mean to presente your 
highnesse with, is as now doth followe, and well suteth 
the temper and condition of him who made it." From a 
letter by Sir John's grandfather to Prince Henry, in 
Harington MS., 1565, printed as above 



NOTES 93 

VI 

Interleaf, British Museum Copy, of Park's Walpole's 
Catalogue, 10804. e. 

VII 

Sloan MSS. 5465. Printed : Ancient Songs and Ballads, 
ed. J. Ritson ; 1802. Also, Reliques of Ancient English 
Poetry, Bishop Percy, ed. E. Rhys; 1906. For Professor 
Skeat's note on the commonly supposed Chaucerian source 
of this poem, see text. Also that writer's work, The 
Chaucer Canon, p. 122. 



VIII 

Rawlins MSS., Oxford, 86: Beginning of the XVIth 
century. Printed : Neuenglisches Lesebuch, ed. E. Fliigel ; 
1895. 

IX 

i to 7. Add. MSS. 31922, Brit. Musm. Printed : Nugz 
Antique. Also, Fliigel. Also, Early English Lyrics, ed. 
Chambers and Sidgwick ; 1907. 

"I entertain no doubt of the author; for if I had no 
better reason than the rhyme, it were sufficient to think 
that no other than suche a king could write suche a sonnet : 
but of this my father oft gave me good assurance, who was 
in his household. This sonnet was sunge to the lady at his 
commandment, and here followeth." (The eagles force, 
etc.) Harlngton MS. 



94 NOTES 



Printed : A General History of Music, Sir John Hawkins ; 
1776. Also, Park's Walpole. 



XI 

Printed. Nugz Antiquz. Also, Hawkins. Also, 
Chambers and Sidgwick, whose text is, by permission, 
here reproduced, from Early English Lyrics, in which it 
is printed for the first time. 



XII 

Printed: Nugz Antiquz, ed. 1804. Also Park's Wal 
pole. L. ii, Noye = Noah. 



XIII 

A selection, the whole extending to more than a hundred 
stanzas, a large number of which are mere repetitions. 
Printed : Le Tombeau de Margurite de Valois, Royne de 
Navarre; 1551. Translation: Miss G. White (for this 
anthology). 



XIV 

Printed : Acts and Monuments (Book of Martyrs), John 
Foxe ; 1563. "Given to Sir Anthony Seynt Leger, knight 
of his privy chamber, being of a corrupt judgment." Foxe. 



NOTES 95 
xv 

Printed; Monument of Matrons ; 1582. Translations: 

Memoirs of Ladies of Gt. Britain, G. Ballard ; 1751. 

Anecdotes of Distinguished Persons, Wm. Seward ; 1795. 

Ballard's last line reads,'" I hope for light after dark 
ness." 



XVI 

1. Printed : The Arte of English Poesie, G. Puttenham ; 
1589. Also, Percy's Reliques, ed. E. Rhys. Stanza 6. 
" The Daughter of Debate," i. e. Mary of Scotland. 

2. Printed: Travels in England; Fugitive Pieces, etc., 
P. Hentzner, trans. R. Bentley, ed. Walpole; 1761. Also, 
Percy's Reliques. 

3. Printed : The Progresses and Public Processions 
of Queen Elizabeth, J. Nichols; 1788. Also, Park's 
Walpole. 



XVII 

i. to 6. Printed : The Essays of a Prentise in the divine 
art of Poesie; 1584. His Majesty's poetical exercises at 
vacant hours, 1591. Basilicon Doron ; 1599. The Works 
of the most high and mighty Prince James, King of 
Gt. Britain, etc., ed. James, Bishop of Winton ; 1616. 
Also, A Chronicle of Scottish Poetry, ed. J. Sibbald ; 1812. 
Scottish Poetry, ed. G. Eyre-Todd ; 1895. Walpole, Percy, 
etc. 



96 NOTES 

XVIII 

A selection, the whole extending to thirty-three stanzas. 
Printed : Nugz Antiquz. " Verses by the Princess 
Elizabeth given to Lord Harington, of Exton, her 
preceptor." Harington MS. 



XIX 

1. Printed: Miscellanea Sacra, ed. Nahum Tate; 1698. 
Also, The Poetical Calendar, ed. F. Fawkes and W. Wotz ; 
1763. 

2. Printed: A General History of Music, C. Burney, 
Mus. D. ; 1776. Also, Percy's Reliques. 



XX 

Printed : History of Music, Hawkins. Appendix. Also, 
Park's Catalogue. 



XXI 

1. Printed: The Tragedy of Albovine, Wm. D'Avenant ; 
1629. Also, The Works of the English Poets, ed. A. 
Chalmers ; 1810. 

2. Printed: Poems, J. Donne, D.D. ; 1633. Also, Park. 

XXII 

I. Manuscript, at Bodleian, Oxford. About seventeen 
rersions already exist, each professing to give the original 



NOTES 97 

text, and each, in turn, failing^so to do. Professor Skeat's 
is the only edition which gives the MS. as it really is. 
Printed : The Kingis Quair, together with A Ballad of 
Good Counsel, by King James I, of Scotland, ed. by The 
Rev. W. W. Skeat, M.A. ; 1884. Professor Skeat has 
revised the stanzas selected for this anthology, and made 
the following remarks and variants on the printed text. 
Stanza i. line 5. Cynthius : C. not S. is meant. 

1. 6. thair : the final e in MS. is only a flourish. 
S. 4. 1. i. us necessarye : /. e. necessary for us. 
S. 5. 1. 2. us : i. e. to us. 

S. 7. 1. 5. "Since every wight that I behold," etc. 

S. 8. 1. 7. was non : '. e. there was no one who could, 
who pitied my sorrows. 

S. 9. 1. 2. thrawldom : final e in MS. unnecessary. 

S. 10. 1. 6. the[e] : the in MS. 

S. 17. 11. 6. 7. chere : a Chaucerian ending. 

S. 1 8. 1. 9. zic. zic : a misreading of etc. etc. 

The z throughout has been rendered y : the former, 
though almost always adopted, is quite incorrect. Punctua 
tion revised. 

2. Four versions. See Professor Skeat's Kingis Quair and 
Ballad of Good Counsel The third version employed here. 
Printed: The Good and Godlie Ballates ; 1578. Also, as 
above, with a restored version by the editor. Professor 
Skeat makes also the following remarks. 

S. i. 1. 4. effray, correct ending: eftray, being printer's 
error. 

1. 5. Exile all vice : Eject all vice, being an error. 
"Except for these two blunders the text is fairly good." 



98 NOTES 

XXIII 

A selection, the whole extending to some twenty-five 
stanzas. Printed: The Life and Death of James I, of 
Scotland, J. Stevenson; 1837. The common error of z 
for y has been rectified, along with other mistakes. 

" Very little of the verse of Margaret of Scotland seems 
to have been preserved, but . . . you will find a Lament 
printed in Stevenson's Life and Death of James I." Dr. 
Edmund Gone. 



XXIV 

Printed : Miscellany, Allan Ramsay, 1729. Also, Ancient 
Scottish Poems, ed. J. Callendar ; 1782. Also, G. Eyre- 
Todd's anthology. The symbol z has again been rendered 
as y. 



XXV 

1. Printed: Seward. Also, Walpole. Translation: Rev. 
Professor Skeat. 

2. Printed : The Love Letters of Mary, Queen of Scots, 
ed. H. Campbell, LL.D; 1825. Translation: Whitaker. 
Mary, Queen of Scots, J. Whitaker, B.D ; 1789. 



XXVI 

Printed : Ancient Scottish Poems, ed. G. Bannantyne ; 
1770. Also, A Chronicle of Scottish Poetry, ed. J. Sibbald ; 



NOTES 99 

i8oz. " It may be added that by far the greater part, if not 
the whole, of the Bannantyne MSS. having been compiled 
within less than three years after the death of Darnley, 
there seems to be no room for entertaining any doubt with 
respect to the author." Sibbald. 



GLOSSARY 



ABANDOUN, left alone, 69 

Agane, against, 70 

Aire, formerly, 77 

Airly, early, 68 

Aith, oath, 80 

Among, at times, 72 

Amovis, move, 76 

Ann, if, 79 

Ariete, the Ram, 67 

Armony, harmony, 72 

At, that, 77 

Aventure, chance, fortune, 

68 

Avance, advance, 87 
Avise, advice, 68 

Ban, curse, swear, 80 
Be, by, 67 (title) 
Ben, indoors, 80 
Bent, field, 79 
Beschadit, shaded, 71 
Blakynge, paleness, 77 
Borowe, to borrow, as a 

pledge, 68 
Braw, bravely, 79 
Breith, wrath, 77 
But, without, 75 
But dreid, doubtless, 76 
Butt, outside, 80 



Cadgily, merrily, 78 
Canty, cheerful, 78 
Carle, man, 78 
Cau, call, 8 1 
Claiths, clothes, 79 
Chere, merriment, 73 
Clead me, clothe myself, 79 
Clowdis, clouds, 75 
Comprisit, included, 70 
Compt, count, 74 
Contruvis, invent, 76 
Copill, complete, 71 
Cure, care, 68 
Cynthius, the Sun, 67 

Dant, tame, 74 
Decoir, adorn, 87 
Dee, die, 76 
Deed, death, 75 
Defaid, make to fade, 77 
Deid, death, 88 
Devisit, intended, 70 
Dike, embankment, 79 
Dreid, see But dreid. 
Dul, grief, 76 
Dule, grief, 88 
Dulfull, doleful, 75 

E'e, eye, 81 



102 



GLOSSARY 



EfFray, terror, 74 
Eird, earth, 76 
Enprise, undertaking, 67 
Ene, eyes, 74 
Erd, earth, 75 

Fain, fond, 78 
Falowe, fellow, 68 
Per, far, 68 
Feynit, feigned, 73 
Fit, spell, course, 80 
Fleuvir, fragrance, 76 
Flurisand, flourishing, 76 
Forby, near, 71 
Fortirit, very tired, 71 
Fremyt, strange, 69 
Fret, adorned, 72 
Fude, food, 71 
Fulye, foliage, 76 

Gaberlunyie, beggar, 80 

Gaed, went, 79 

Gar ride, bid ride, 80 

Gar rin, bid run, 80 

Geir, gear, 79 

Ger, make, 75 

Gilt, offended, 69 

Glad, gladness, 68 

Glew, glee, 77 

Gloir, glory, 87 

Glore, glory, 76 

Good-eens, good evenings, 78 

Graip, feel your way, 74 

Greis, degrees, 68 

Grittar, greater, 88 

Habound, abound, 75 



Haill, wholly, 87 

Hal, whole, 75 

Hedis, heads, 71 

Hee's, he shall, 80 

Heil, cover, clothe, 77 

Her lane, alone by herself, 79 

Herbere, garden, 71 

Hes, have, 88 

Hind, away, 80 

Hippit, hopped, 71 

Hycht, height, 76 

Illfardly, uglily, 81 
Ingle, fire, 78 

Jenepere, juniper, 71 

Kalendis, beginnings, 72 
Kauk, chalk (used in telling 

fortunes), 81 
Keel, ruddle (used in telling 

fortunes), 81 
Ken, know, 78 
Kend, knew, 81 
Kirn, churn, 80 
Kist, chest, 79 
Knet, knit, 71 

Laith, loath, 80 
Lane : tee Her lane 
Leal, honest, 79 
Lee, field, 80 
Licht, cheery, 87 
Lonchis, lakes, 75 
Lyf, living person, 69 
Lyvand, living, 73 

Maik, mate, 88 



GLOSSARY 



103 



Makis, mates, 72 
Maugre, in spite of, 69 
Mo, more, 88 
Mollest, grieved, 87 
Monde, world, 75 
Morowe, morning, 68 
Mou, mouth, 8 1 

Nare, nigher, 88 
Ninny, granny, 76 
Noblesse, nobleness, 74 
Nowmer, number, 68 

Or, before, 74 
Owre, over, 80 

Pance, think, thought, 87, 

88 

Pauky, cunning, sly, 78 
Peir, pier, 75 
Petwys, piteous, 75 
Pleser, pleasure, 87 
Priving, taste, 80 

Quha, who, 88 
Quhilk, whom, who, 75 
Quhilk as, which that, 76 
Quhill, till, 88 
Quyte, requite, 74 

Reft, bereft of, 76 
Relesche, release, 69 
Reuly, in due order, 75 
Revere, river, 75 
Rew, rue, 77 
Rought, reeked, 70 
Rute, root, 74 



Sa, so, 74 
Sal, shall, 88 
Schaw, show, 88 
Schedull, petition, 88 
Schupe, ordained, 69 
Servis, serveth, 88 
Seyne, say, 70 
Shee's, she shall, 80 
She'ld, she would, 81 
Slee, sly, 78 
Snaw, snow, 79 
Souk, suck, 75 
Spede, help, 70 
Speir, enquire, 79 
Sprad, spread, 68 
Stankis, ponds, 75 
Steik, close, 74 
Stown, stolen, 79 
Sueit, sweet, 88 
Suting, sweating, 88 
Sweit, sweat, 88 
Syne, afterwards, 75 

Tane, taken, 75 
Thir, those, 75 
Thoftes, thoughts, 87 
Thole, suffer, 77 
Thrang, busy, 78 
Till, to, 75 
To-forowe, before, 68 
Trigland, trickling, 75 
Trow, trust, 81 
Turtour, turtle, 88 
Twa, two, 78 

Up, on, 79 



I0 4 



GLOSSARY 



Ver, spring, 67 

Waldis, worlds, 76 
Waleis, valleys, 75 
Wallowit, withered, 74 
Wat, wet, 78 
Wawis, waves, 69 
Waymenting, lamenting, 75 
Wee, short time, 79 
Weird, fate, 76 



Whang, piece, 80 

Whorle, weight at end of 

thread, 81 
Wicht, wight, 87 
Womanheid, womanhood, 88 
Wood, mad, 80 
Wy, man, 77 

Ybought, bought, 73 
Yeiris, years, 68 



INDEX TO FIRST LINES 

PAGE 

A coward's still unsafe ; but courage knows . . xiv 
A queen, without peer ...... 32 

Alone walking . . . . . . . .16 

As I was pansing in the morning air . . . .49 

As the holly groweth green 22 

Christ was the Word they spake it . . .38 

Close thine eyes and sleep secure . . . -55 
Defiled is my name full sore ..... 27 
Deo juvante, nil nocet livor malus .... 39 
Excellent Sovereign ! seemly to see .... 9 
Fain would I climb, yet fear I to fall .... xiv 
Forgetting God to love a king . . . . -3* 
From the top of all my trust ..... xiv 
Gife langour makis men licht ..... 87 
Go litill tretise, nakit of eloquence .... xvi 
God gives not kings the style of gods in vain . . 45 
Great Monarch of the world, from Whose pow'r springs 56 
Here lies the mutton-eating king xv 

How cruelly these captives do conspire ... 46 
I cannot blame those men that knew thee well . . 63 
I grieve, and dare not show my discontent . . 43 

I pass all my hours in a shady old grove ... 60 
105 



io6 INDEX TO FIRST LINES 

PAGE 

If captive wight attempt the tuneful strain. . . 5 

If death could speak, the king would say ... XT 

If thy heart fail thee, climb not at all . . . . xnr 

In Eucharist then there is bread 35 
In Vere, that full of vertu is and gude (from The King'u 

Quair) 67 

Kingdoms are but cares ...... i* 

Kings with the Muses ease their wearied minds . . viii 

Lo I here, my son, a mirror vive and fair ... 47 

My heart is set upon a lusty pin .... 17 

My Lord and my God, I have trusted in Thee . . 8z 

Non aliena putes homini quz obtingere possunt . . 39 

O Death I rock me asleep *8 

O Domine Deus 1 speravi in te 81 

O Reason 3 

Oh, Fortune I how thy restless wavering state . . 41 

Pastime with good company *o 

Profane no Divine Ordinances xiv 

Roger L'Estrange x* 

Sen throw vertew incressis dignitie .... 74 

Should this fair rose offend thy sight . . . : 3 

Somewhat musing 14 

The doubt of future foes exiles my present joy . . 41 

The eagle's force subdues each bird that flies . . 10 

The facound Greek, Demosthenes by name ... 47 

The nations banded 'gainst the Lord ot might . . 48 
The pauky aulde carle came ovir the lee (The Gaber- 

lunyie Man), . . . . . 78 



INDEX TO FIRST LINES 107 

PAGE 

The word of denial, the letter otffty .... xiii 

Thee, mychti Makar of the major monde ... 75 

This is joy! this is true pleasure .... 51 

Though some say that youth ruleth me ... 24 

To mortal's common fate thy mind resign ... 40 

Whate'er to man, as mortal, is assign'd ... 39 

What time rough winter's blasts the earth did tame . 7 

Whereto should I express ...... 25 

While God assists us, envy bites in vain ... 40 

While, in a tone of deepest woe . . . 83 

Whoso that will for grace sue ..... 25 

Why should the fond ambition of a friend ... 62 

Without dischord ....... 23 



FINIS 



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January 1908. 



A CONCISE LIST OF 

THE KING'S CLASSICS 

GENERAL EDITOR: PROFESSOR I. GOLLANCZ, Litt.D. 



ALTHOUGH The King's Classics are to be purchased 
for 1/6 net per volume, the series is unique in 
that 

(1) the letterpress, paper, and binding are unap- 
proached by any similar series. 

(2) ** Competent scholars in every case have super 
vised this series, which can therefore be received with 
confidence." Athenaum. 

(3) With few exceptions, the volumes in this series 
are included in no similar series, while several are 
copyright. 




THE KING'S CLASSICS 



UNDER THE GENERAL EDITORSHIP OF PROFESSOR I. GOLLANCZ, 
LITT.D. 

" Right Royal Series." Literary World. 

"We note with pleasure that competent scholars in every 
case have supervised this series, which can therefore be received 
with confidence." Athenceum. 

The Series of " King's Classics," issued under the General 
Editorship of Professor I. GOLLANCZ, aims at introducing to the 
larger reading public many noteworthy works of literature not 
readily accessible in cheap form, or not hitherto rendered into 
English. Each volume is edited by some expert scholar, and 
has a summary introduction dealing with the main and essential 
facts of the literary history of the book ; at the end there are 
the necessary notes for a right understanding of references and 
textual difficulties ; where necessary, there is also a carefully- 
compiled index. As will be at once seen from the accompanying 
list, much original and new work has been secured for the 
Series, and it will be recognised that the " King's Classics " 
differentiate themselves in a very marked way from the many 
reprints of popular books. 

It should be noted, however, that while primarily rare 
masterpieces are included in the " King's Classics," modern 
popular classics, more especially such as have not yet been 
adequately or at all annotated, are not excluded from the Series. 

NOTE. At the date of this list, January 1908, Nos, 1-39, 
41, 43, 45, 47, 48 and 49 ivere publithed. Other numbers subsequent 
to 39 ivere at press or about to go to press, 

3 



4 THE KING'S CLASSICS 

The " King's Classics " are printed on antique laid paper, 
1 6mo. (6 x 4$ inches), gilt tops, and are issued in the following 
styles and prices. Each volume has a frontispiece, usually in 
photogravure. 

Quarter bound, antique grey boards, 1/6 net. 

Red Cloth, 1/6 net. 

Quarter Vellum, grey cloth sides, 2/6 net. 

Special three-quarter Vellum, Oxford side-papers, gilt tops, 

silk marker, 5/- net. 

%* Nos. 2, 20 and 24 are double volumes. Price, Boards or 
Cloth, 3/- net ; Quarter Vellum, 5/- net ; special 
three-quarter Vellum, 7/6 net. 

NOTE. In response to many applications, school-masters requiring 
"volumes in this series for class use may obtain not less than 25 copies 
of any one title, in stout paper covers, price I/- net. Double volumes 
2/- net. 

SUMMARY LIST 

(For detailed list see below) 

1. THE LOVE OF BOOKS (The Philobiblon). 

2. Six DRAMAS or CALDERON. Translated by EDWARD FITZ 
GERALD. (See No. 16.) [Double volume. 

3. THE CHRONICLE OF JOCELIN OF BRAKELOND. (See No. 20.) 

4. THE LIFE OF SIR THOMAS MORE. (See Nos. 33, 40, 44.) 

5. EIKON BASILIKE. 

6. 7. KINGS' LETTERS. 

I. Alfred to the Coming of the Tudors. II. From the Early 
Tudors to the Love-letters of Henry VIII. and Anne Boleyn. 
Two further volumes are in preparation. (See Nos. 51, 52.) 

8. CHAUCER'S KNIGHT'S TALE. 

9. CHAUCER'S MAN OF LAW'S TALE, etc. 
10. CHAUCER'S PRIORESS'S TALE, etc. 

8-IO In modern English by Prof. SKEAT. (See Nos. 18, 41, 
47. 40 



THE KING'S CLASSICS 5 

11. THE ROMANCE OF FULK FITZ-WARINE. 

12. THE STORY OF CUPID AND PSYCHE. 

13. EVELYN'S LIFE OF MARGARET GODOLPHIN. 

14. EARLY LIVES OF DANTE. (See No. 46.) 

15. THE FALSTAFF LETTERS. 

16. POLONIUS. By EDWARD FITZGERALD. (See No. 2.) 

17. MEDIEVAL LORE. 

1 8. THE VISION OF PIERS THE PLOWMAN. 

In modern English by Prof. SKEAT. (See Nos. 8-10, 41, 47, 
48,51.) 

19. THE GULL'S HORNBOOK. 

20. THE NUN'S RULE, or Ancren Riwle. 

In modern English. (See No. 3.) [Double -volume. 

21. THE MEMOIRS or ROBERT GARY, EARL OF MONMOUTH. 

22. EARLY LIVES OF CHARLEMAGNE. (See No. 45.) 

23. CICERO'S "FRIENDSHIP," "OLD AGE," AND "SciPio's DREAM." 

24. WORDSWORTH'S PRELUDE. [Double volume. 

25. THE DEFENCE or GUENEVERE, etc. 

26. 27. BROWNING'S " MEN AND WOMEN." 

28. POE'S POEMS. 

29. SHAKESPEARE'S SONNETS. 

30. GEORGE ELIOT'S SILAS MARNER. 

31. GOLDSMITH'S VICAR OF WAKEFIELD. 

32. CHARLES READE'S PEG WOFFINGTON. 

33. THE HOUSEHOLD OF SIR THOMAS MORE. (See Nos. 4, 40, 44.) 

34. SAPPHO : One Hundred Lyrics. By BLISS CARMAN. 

35. WINE, WOMEN, AND SONG. 

36. 37. GEORGE PETTIE'S "PETITE PALLACE OF PETTIE HIS 

PLEASURE." 
38. WALPOLE'S CASTLE OF OTRANTO. 



6 THE KING'S CLASSICS 

39. THI ROYAL POETS OF ENGLAND AND SCOTLAND. (See Nos. 

67> 5i5 2 > 57-) 

40. SIR THOMAS MORI'S UTOPIA. (See Nos. 4, 33, 44.) 

41. CHAUCER'S LEGEND or GOOD WOMEN. 

Modern English by Prof. SKEAT. (See Nos. 8-10, 18, 47, 48.) 

42. SWIFT'S BATTLE OF THE BOOKS, etc. 

43. SIR WILLIAM TEMPLE UPON THE GARDENS OF EPICURUS, etc. 

44. SIR THOMAS MORE'S FOUR LAST THINGS, etc. (See Nos. 

4, 33. 4-) 

45. THE SONG OF ROLAND. (See No. 22.) 

46. DANTE'S VITA NUOVA. Italian text with D. G. ROSSETTI'S 

translation on the opposite page. (See No. 14.) 

47. CHAUCER'S PROLOGUE AND MINOR POEMS. 

48. CHAUCER'S PARLIAMENT OF BIRDS AND HOUSE OF FAME. 

47, 48 In modern Englhh by Prof. SKEAT. (See Nos. 8-io 
18,41.) 

49. CRANFORD. 

50. PEARL. Edited by Prof. I. GOLLANCZ. 

51. 52. KINGS' LETTERS. III. and IV. (See Nos. 6, 7.) 

53. THE ENGLISH CORRESPONDENCE OF S. BONIFACE. 

54, 55. ESSAYS OF ELIA. I. and II. Edited by THOMAS SECCOMBI. 

56. THE CAVALIER TO HIS LADY. 

57. ASSER'S LIFE OF KING ALFRED. (See Nos. 6, 39.) 

58. TRANSLATIONS FROM THE ICELANDIC. 

59. THE RULE OF ST. BENET. Edited by Abbot GASQUET. 

(See Nos. 3, 20.) 

60. DANIEL'S "DELIA" and DRAYTON'S "IDEA." 



THE KING'S CLASSICS 7 

DETAILED LIST GROUPED ACCORD 
ING TO PERIOD AND SUBJECT 

i. THE LOVE OF BOOKS: being the Philo- 

biblon of RICHARD DE BURY. 

Translated by E. C. THOMAS. Frontispiece, Seal of Richard 
de Bury (as Bishop of Durham). 

57. ASSER'S LIFE OF KING ALFRED. 

Newly translated and edited by L. C. JANE, M.A. Frontis 
piece. 

3. THE CHRONICLE OF JOCELIN OF 
BRAKELOND, MONK OF ST. EDMUNDS 
BURY : a Picture of Monastic and Social Life 
in the Xllth Century. 

Newly translated, from the original Latin, with notes, table of 
dates relating to the Abbey of St. Edmundsbury, and index, 
by L. C. JANE, M.A. Introduction by the Right Rev. Abbot 
GASQUET. Frontispiece, Seal of Abbot Samson (A.D. 1200). 
(See No. 20.) 

50. PEARL. 

An English Poem of the Fourteenth Century. Edited with 
a modern rendering and Introduction by Professor I. GOLLANCZ, 
Litt.D. With a Frontispiece after W. HOLMAN HUNT, and 
Prefatory lines by the late Lord TENNYSON. A revision of the 
edition of 1891. (See No. 18.) 

V 20. THE NUN'S RULE, or Ancren Riwle, 
in Modern English. [Double -volume. 

Being the injunctions of Bishop Poore intended for the 
guidance of nuns or anchoresses, as set forth in this famous 
thirteenth-century MS. 

Editor, the Right Rev. Abbot GASQUET. Frontispiece, Seal 
of Bishop Poore. (See Nos. 3, 59.) 



8 THE KING'S CLASSICS 

59. THE RULE OF ST. BENET. 

Translated and edited by the Right Rev. Abbot GASQUET. 
Frontispiece. 

53. THE ENGLISH CORRESPONDENCE OF 
SAINT BONIFACE. 

Being the letters exchanged between "The Apostle of the 
Germans," while engaged in his missionary labours on the Con 
tinent, and his English friends. Translated and edited, and with 
a brief Introductory sketch of the Life of Saint Boniface, by 
E. J. KYLIE, M.A. 

17. MEDLEVAL LORE. 

From Bartholomaeus Anglicus. Edited with notes, index and 
glossary by ROBERT STEELE. Preface by the late WILLIAM 
MORRIS. Frontispiece, an old illumination, representing 
Astrologers using Astrolabes. 

The book is drawn from one of the most widely-read works 
of mediaeval times. Its popularity is explained by its scope, 
which comprises explanations of allusions to natural objects 
met with in Scripture and elsewhere. It was, in fact, an 
account of the properties of things in general. 

ii. THE ROMANCE OF FULK FITZ- 
WARINE. 

Newly translated from the Anglo-French by ALICE KEMF- 
WELCH, with an introduction by Professor BRANDIN. Frontis 
piece, Whittington Castle in Shropshire, the seat of the 
Fitzwarines. 

45. THE SONG OF ROLAND. 

Newly translated from the old French by Mrs. CROSLAND. 
Introduction by Professor BRANDIN, University of London. 
Frontispiece after a page of the Oxford MS. 



THE KING'S CLASSICS 9 

22. EARLY LIVES OF CHARLEMAGNE. 

Translated and edited by A. J. GRANT. With frontispiece 
representing an early bronze figure of Charlemagne from the 
Musee Carnavalet, Paris. 

We have here given us two " Lives " of Charlemagne by 
contemporary authorities one by Eginhard and the other by 
the Monk of St. Gall. Very different in style, when brought 
together in one volume each supplies the deficiencies of the 
other. 

58. TRANSLATIONS FROM THE ICE 
LANDIC : select passages from Icelandic 
Literature. 

Translated and edited by the Rev. W. C. GREEN, M.A. 

35. WINE, WOMEN, AND SONG. 

Mediaeval students' songs, translated from the Latin, with an 
essay, by JOHN ADDINGTON SYMONDS. Frontispiece after a 
fifteenth-century woodcut. 

1 8. THE VISION OF PIERS THE PLOWMAN. 

By WILLIAM LANGLAND 5 in modern English by Professor 
SKEAT, Litt.D. Frontispiece, "God Speed the Plough," from 
an old MS. 

8. CHAUCER'S KNIGHT'S TALE, or Palamon 

and Arcite. 

In modern English by Professor SKEAT, Litt.D. Frontispiece, 
" The Canterbury Pilgrims," from an illuminated MS. 

9. CHAUCER'S MAN OF LAW'S TALE, 

Squire's Tale, and Nun's Priest's Tale. 
In modern English by Professor SKEAT, Litt.D. Frontispiece 
from an illuminated MS. 



io THE KING'S CLASSICS 

10. CHAUCER'S PRIORESS'S TALE, Par 
doner's Tale, Clerk's Tale, and Canon's 
Yeoman's Tale. 

In modern English by Professor SKEAT, Litt.D. Frontispiece, 
" The Patient Griselda," from the well-known fifteenth-century 
picture of the Umbrian School in the National Gallery. 

41. CHAUCER'S LEGEND OF GOOD 
WOMEN. 

In modern English, with notes and introduction, by Professor 
W. W. SKEAT, Litt.D. Frontispiece, "Ariadne Deserted," after 
the painting by ANGELICA KAUFMANS. 

47. CHAUCER'S PROLOGUE AND MINOR 

POEMS. 

In modern English by Professor SKEAT, Litt.D. Frontispiece, 
Portrait of Chaucer after the Ellesmere MS. 

48. CHAUCER'S PARLIAMENT OF BIRDS 

AND HOUSE OF FAME. 

In modern English by Professor SKEAT, Litt.D. Frontispiece, 
after Sir E. BURNE JONES, from the Kelmscott Chaucer. 

36,37. GEORGE PETTIE'S "PETITE PAL- 
LACE OF PETTIE HIS PLEASURE." 

The popular Elizabethan book containing twelve classical 
love-stories " Sinorix and Camma," " Tereus and Progne," 
etc. in style the precursor of Euphues, now first reprinted 
under the editorship of Professor I. GOLLANCZ. Frontispieces, 
a reproduction of the original title, and of an original page. 

[In two volumes. 

21. THE MEMOIRS OF ROBERT GARY, 

Earl of Monmouth. 

Being a contemporary record of the life of that nobleman as 
Warden of the Marches and at the Court of Elizabeth. 



THE KING'S CLASSICS i, 

Editor, G. H. POWELL. With frontispiece from the original 
edition, representing Queen Elizabeth in a state procession, with 
the Earl of Monmouth and others in attendance. 

19. THE GULL'S HORNBOOK. 

By THOMAS DEKKER. Editor, R. B. MCK.ERROW. Frontis 
piece, The nave of St. Paul's Cathedral at the time of Elizabeth. 

29. SHAKESPEARE'S SONNETS. 

Editor, C. C. STOPES. Frontispiece, Portrait of the Earl of 
Southampton. 

4. THE LIFE OF SIR THOMAS MORE, 

Knight. 

By his son-in-law, WILLIAM ROPER. With letters to and from 
his famous daughter, Margaret Roper. Frontispiece, Portrait of 
Sir Thomas More, after Holbein. 

33. THE HOUSEHOLD OF SIR THOMAS 
MORE. 

By ANNE MANNING. Preface by RICHARD GARNETT. Frontis 
piece, " The Family of Sir Thomas More." 

40. SIR THOMAS MORE'S UTOPIA. 

Now for the first time edited in modern spelling from the first 
English edition, with notes and bibliography by ROBERT STEELE. 
Frontispiece, Portrait of Sir Thomas More, after an early 
engraving. 

44. THE FOUR LAST THINGS, by SIR T. 

MORE, together with A Spiritual Consolation 
and other Treatises by JOHN FISHER, Bishop of 
Rochester. 

Edited by DANIEL O'CONNOR. Frontispiece after two designs 
from the " Daunce of Death." 



^ THE KING'S CLASSICS 

43. SIR WILLIAM TEMPLE UPON THE 
GARDENS OF EPICURUS, together with 
other XVIIth Century Garden Essays. 
Edited, and with notes and introduction, by A. FORBU 
SIEVEKING, F.S.A. Frontispiece, Portrait of Sir William 
Temple, and five reproductions of early " Garden " engravings. 

5. EIKON BASILIKE : or, The King's Book. 

Edited by EDWARD ALMACK, F.S.A. Frontispiece, Portrait of 
King Charles I. This edition, which has been printed from an 
advance copy of the King's Book seized by Cromwell's soldiers, 
is the first inexpensive one for a hundred years in which the 
original spelling of the first edition has been preserved. 

6, 7, 51, 52. KINGS' LETTERS. 

Part I. Letters of the Kings of England, from Alfred to the 
Coming of the Tudors, newly edited from the originals by 
ROBERT STEELE, F.S.A. Frontispiece, Portrait of Henry V. 

Part II. From the Early Tudors, with the love-letters of 
Henry VIII. and Anne Boleyn, and with frontispiece, Portrait 
of Anne Boleyn. 

Parts III. and IV., bringing the series up to modern times, 
are in preparation, under the same editorship, as Nos. 51, 52. 

39. THE ROYAL POETS OF ENGLAND 
AND SCOTLAND. 

Being Original Poems by English Kings and other Royal and 
Noble Persons, now first collected and edited by W. BAILEY- 
KEMPLING. Frontispiece, Portrait of King James I. of Scotland, 
after an early engraving. 

56. THE CAVALIER TO HIS LADY : an 

Anthology of XVIIth Century Love Songs. 
Selected and edited by FRANK SIDGWICK, M.A. Frontispiece. 



THE KING'S CLASSICS 13 

60. DANIEL'S "DELIA" AND DRAYTON'S 
"IDEA": two Elizabethan sonnet-sequences. 

Edited by ARUNDELL ESDAILE, M.A. Frontispiece. 

13. THE LIFE OF MARGARET GODOLPHIN. 

By JOHN EVELYN, the famous diarist. Re-edited from the 
edition of Samuel Wilberforce, Bishop of Oxford. Frontispiece, 
Portrait of Margaret Godolphin engraved on copper. 

15. THE FALSTAFF LETTERS. 

Editor, JAMES WHITE, possibly with the assistance of CHARLES 
LAMB, cf. the Introduction. Frontispiece, Sir John Falstaff dancing 
to Master Brooks' fiddle, from the original edition. 

14. EARLY LIVES OF DANTE. 

Comprising Boccaccio's Life of Dante, Leonardo Bruni's Life 
of Dante, and other important contemporary records. 

Translated and edited by the Rev. PHILIP H. WICKSTEED. 
Frontispiece, The Death-mask of Dante. 

46. DANTE'S VITA NUOVA. 

The Italian text with D. G. ROSSETTI'S translation on the 
opposite page. Introduction and notes by Professor H. OF.LSNER, 
Ph.D., Lecturer in Romance Literature, Oxford University. 
Frontispiece after the original water-colour sketch for " Dante's 
Dream," by D. G. ROSSETTI. 

12. THE STORY OF CUPID AND PSYCHE. 

From "The Golden Ass" of Apuleius, translated by W. 
ADLINGTON (1566), edited by W. H. D. ROUSE, Litt.D. With 
frontispiece representing the " Marriage of Cupid and Psyche," 
after a gem now in the British Museum. 

23. CICERO'S "FRIENDSHIP," "OLD AGE," 
AND "SCIPIO'S DREAM." 

From early translations. Editor, W. H. D. ROUSE, Litt.D. 
Frontispiece, "Scipio, Laelius and Cato conversing," from a 
fourteenth-century MS. 



14 THE KING'S CLASSICS 

V * SIX DRAMAS OF CALDERON. 

Translated by EDWARD FITZGERALD. Editor, H. OELSNCR, 
M.A., Ph.D. Frontispiece, Portrait of Calderon, from an 
etching by M. EGUSQUIZA. [Double volume. 

42. SWIFT'S BATTLE OF THE BOOKS. 

Together with Selections from the Literature of 

the Ancient and Modern Learning Controversy. 

Edited by A. GUTHKELCH, with notes and introduction. 

Frontispiece. 

38. WALPOLE'S CASTLE OF OTRANTO. 

The introduction of Sir WALTER SCOTT. Preface by Miss C. 
SPURGEON. Frontispiece, Portrait of Walpole, after a contem 
porary engraving. 

30. GEORGE ELIOT'S SILAS MARNER. 

Frontispiece, Portrait of George Eliot, from a water-colour 
drawing by Mrs. CHARLES BRAY. Introduction by RICHARD 
GARNETT. 

31. GOLDSMITH'S VICAR OF WAKEFIELD. 

Introduction by RICHARD GARNETT. Frontispiece, Portrait of 
Oliver Goldsmith. 

32. CHARLES READE'S PEG WOFFINGTON. 

Frontispiece, Portrait of Peg Woffington. Introduction by 
RICHARD GARNETT. 

1 6. POLONIUS, a Collection of Wise Saws and 

Modern Instances. 

By EDWARD FITZGERALD. With portrait of Edward Fitz- 
Gerald from the miniature by Mrs. E. M. B. RIVETT-CARNAC 
as frontispiece ; notes and index. Contains a preface by EDWARD 
FITZGERALD, on Aphorisms generally. 

V 2 4- WORDSWORTH'S PRELUDE. 

The introduction and notes have been written by W. BASIL 
WORSFOLD, M.A., and the frontispiece is taken from the portrait 



THE KING'S CLASSICS 15 

of Wordsworth by H. W. PICKERSGILL, R.A., in the National 
Gallery. A map of the Lake District is added. 

[Double volume. 

54, 55. THE ESSAYS OF ELIA. 

Fully edited, with Notes, Introduction, etc, by THOMAS 
SECCOMBE, M.A. Frontispieces. 

49. MRS. GASKELL'S CRANFORD. 

With an Introduction by R. BRIMLEY JOHNSON. The frontis 
piece reproduced after the portrait by Sir W. RICHMOND, R.A. 

25. THE DEFENCE OF GUENEVERE and 

other Poems by WILLIAM MORRIS. 
Editor, ROBERT STEELE. With reproduction of DANTE 
GABRIEL ROSSETTI'S picture of " Lancelot and Guenevere at 
King Arthur's tomb" as frontispiece. 

26, 27. BROWNING'S "MEN AND WOMEN." 

Edited with introduction and notes by W. BASIL WORSFOLD, 
M.A. Two volumes, each with portrait of Browning as 
frontispiece. [In two -volumes. 

28. FOE'S POEMS. 

Editor, EDWARD HUTTON. Frontispiece, Poe's cottage. 

34. SAPPHO : One Hundred Lyrics 

By BLISS CARMAN. With frontispiece after a Greek gem. 
To be continued, 

NOTE. At the date of this list, January 1908, Nos. 1-39, 
41, 43, 45, 47, 48 and 49 -were published. Other numbers 
subsequent to 39 tuere at press or about to go to press. 

CHATTO & WINDUS, 
in ST. MARTIN'S LANE, LONDON, W.C. 

[Please turn over. 



THE SHAKESPEARE 
LIBRARY 

General Editor, PROFESSOR I. GOLLANCZ, Litt.D. 

PART I. THE OLD-SPELLING SHAKESPEARE, in 
40 Vols. Editor, Dr. F. J. FURNIVALL, in some cases 
with the late W. G. BOSWELL-STONI. 

PART II. THE SHAKESPEARE CLASSICS : a series 
of reprints embodying the Novels, Plays and Romances, 
used by Shakespeare as the originals or direct sources 
of his Plays. 

PART III. THE LAMB SHAKESPEARE FOR THE 
YOUNG : edited by Prof. GOLLANCZ. Each volume 
is illustrated and contains the chief songs set to music 
for home or school use. 

PART IV. SHAKESPEARE'S ENGLAND : a series 
of volumes illustrative of the life, thought, and letters 
of England in Shakespeare's time. 

The detailed prospectus pott free on application. 



BIBLIOTHECA ROMANICA 

Under the sub-headings Bibliotheque Franfaise, Biblioteca 
Iraliana, Biblioteca Espanola, Biblioteca Portuguesa are 
here issued selected classics of the Romance Languages, 
in, and with notes and necessary introductions also in, the 
original language of the several volumes. Cartridge paper 
binding $J. net, cloth is. net. 

The detailed protpectut post free on application. 



CHATTO & WINDUS 
Publishers 




in St. Martin's 
W Lane, 

London, W.C. 



[R. Clay <> Sent, Ltd., London and Bungny. 



PR Kempling, William Bailey 
1178 Poets royal of England 
R6K4 and Scotland 



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